Unseen Passage English: 5 case study-based comprehension passage Reading for Class 10

Case Based Passage for Class 10 edumantra.net

Here you will find our collection of case study-based comprehension passage English exercises, a new addition to the CBSE curriculum designed to improve your comprehension passage reading skills.

Unseen Passage English 1: Comprehension Passage Reading and Questions

1. The UN’s 2017 International Year tells that sustainable tourism is an important tool for development, most importantly in poor communities and countries. Today sustainability — environmental, social, and economic – is increasingly recognised as the benchmark for all tourism business. As noted by the UN World Tourism Organisation, 57% of international tourist arrivals will be in emerging economies, by 2030. The various ‘Tourism Terms’ are defined as follows:

CategoryDefinition
EcotourismResponsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, socially and economically sustains the well-being of local people, and creates knowledge and understanding through interpretation and education of all involved (including staff, travellers, and community residents).
Ethical TourismTourism in a destination where ethical issues are the key driver, e.g. social injustice, human rights, animal welfare, or the environment.
GeotourismTourism that sustains or enhances the geographical character of a place – its environment, heritage, aesthetics, culture, and well-being of its residents.
Pro-Poor TourismTourism that results in increased net benefit for the poor people in a destination.
Responsible TourismTourism that maximises the benefits to local communities, minimises negative social or environmental impacts, and helps local people conserve fragile cultures and habitats or species.
Sustainable TourismTourism that leads to the management of all resources in such a way that economic, social, and aesthetic needs can be fulfilled while maintaining cultural integrity, essential ecological processes, biological diversity, and life-support systems.  

1.Based on data collected by a survey by Travel Bureau, the following market profile of an ecotourist was constructed:

Age: 35 – 54 years old, although age varied with activity and other factors such as cost.
Gender: 50% female and 50% male, although clear differences based on activity were found.
Education: 82% were college graduates, a shift in interest in ecotourism from those who have high levels of education to those with less education was also found, indicating an expansion into mainstream markets.
Household composition: No major differences were found between general tourists and experienced ecotourists.
Party composition: A majority (60%) of experienced ecotourism respondents stated they prefer to travel as a couple, with only 15% stating they preferred to travel with their families, and 13% preferring to travel alone.
(experienced ecotourists = Tourists that had been on at least one “ecotourism” oriented trip.)
Trip duration: The largest group of experienced ecotourists— (50%) preferred trips lasting 8-14 days.
Expenditure: Experienced ecotourists were willing to spend more than general tourists, the largest group (26%).
Important elements of trip: Experienced ecotourists top three responses were: (a) wilderness setting, (b) wildlife viewing, (c) hiking/trekking.
Motivations for taking next trip: Experienced ecotourists top two responses were (a) enjoy scenery/ nature, (b) new experiences/places.

After reading the comprehension passage, proceed to the questions that test your understanding.

(i) In the line “……….. recognised as the benchmark”, the word “benchmark” does not refer to:
(a) a basis for something.
(b) the criterion required.
(c) the ability to launch something new.
(d) a standard point of reference.

(ii) The World Tourism Organisation of the UN, in an observation, shared that:
(a) emerging economies of the world will gain 57% of their annual profits from international tourists.
(b) countries with upcoming economies shall see maximum tourist footfall from all over the world in the next decade.
(c) many international tourists in 2030 will be from developing countries.
(d) barely any tourist in the next decade shall travel from an economically strong nation to a weak one.

(iii) Choose the option that lists the correct answers for the following:
1. Asha Mathew, an NRI, loves animals and wishes to travel to places that safeguard their rights and inculcate awareness of their rights. What kind of tourist is she?
2. Gurdeep Singh from UK is an environmental scientist and has always chosen to travel to places that are examples of a symbiotic relationship between man and nature. What kind of tourist is he?
(a) (1) is an ecotourist and (2) is a geotourist.
(b) (1) is an ethical tourist and (2) is a geotourist.
(c) (1) is a sustainable tourist and (2) is a pro-poor tourist.
(d) (1) is a geotourist and (2) is a responsible tourist.

(iv) Based on your understanding of the passage, choose the option that lists the inherent qualities of geotourism.

1. showcases adventure sports  
2. promotes landscape appreciations
3. promises luxurious travel
4.includes being environmentally responsible
believes in commercialising forests  
6.Initiates donations for the underprivileged  

(a) 1 and 2
(b) 5 and 6
(c) 2 and 4
(d) 3 and 5

(v) In the market profile of an ecotourist, the information on gender indicates that:
(a) female ecotourists were more than the male ecotourists.
(b) the activity preferences were varied in females and males.
(c) the choice of things to do on a trip were quite similar for both the genders.
(d) male ecotourists were frequent travellers.

(vi) According to the survey, one of the most powerful driving forces leading experienced ecotourism to invest in new trips was:
(a) setting up work stations in new places.
(b) the chance to go camping in the wild.
(c) competing with other ecotourists as frequent travellers.
(d) the opportunity to travel to new places.

(vii) Choose the option that lists statement that is NOT TRUE.
(a) Economically backward countries will benefit from sustainable tourism.
(b) The tourism business currently recognises sustainability as an important factor.
(c) Emerging economies will receive negligible international tourists in the near future.
(d) The sustainability factor in tourism is a significant means for development.

(viii) The survey clearly showed that the age range of ecotourists:
(a) remained the same for the choice of tourist attractions to visit.
(b) changed with the monetary requirements for the trip.
(c) fluctuated due to male-female ratio.
(d) was constant across various features of the trip.

(ix) The education aspect in the market profile of the ecotourist revealed that ecotourism was no more limited to the small group of highly educated travellers. (True/False)
(x) According to the survey conducted by the Travel Bureau, the total percentage of experienced ecotourist who did not prefer to travel was………….

 Answers:

(i)(c) the ability to launch something new.
(ii) (b) countries with upcoming economies shall see maximum tourist footfall from all over the world in the next decade.
(iii)(b) (1) is an ethical tourist and (2) is a geotourist.
(iv) (c) 2 and 4
(v) (b) the activity preferences were varied in females and males.
(vi) (d) the opportunity to travel to new places.
(vii) (c) Emerging economies will receive negligible international tourists in the near future.
(viii) (b) changed with the monetary requirements for the trip.
(ix) True
(x) 75%

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Unseen Passage English 2: Analyze and Answer

1. More than 87,000 healthcare workers have been infected with Covid-19, with just six states – Maharashtra, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Delhi, West Bengal and Gujarat – accounting for three-fourths (around 74%) of the case burden and over 86% of the 573 deaths due to the infection, official data showed. Maharashtra alone, with the highest number of over 7.3 lakh confirmed Covid cases so far, accounts for around 28% of the infected healthcare workers and over 60% of the total deaths, according to the data.
2. While Maharashtra, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu had tested over one lakh healthcare workers each till August 28, Karnataka reported only 12,260 infected healthcare workers – almost half the burden in Maharashtra. Tamil Nadu reported 11,169 cases that included doctors, nurses and Asha workers.
The three states together accounted for 55% of the total cases among health workers. Risk to frontline workers can jeopardise India’s Covid fight – The three states also reported the highest number of deaths in healthcare professionals, though with a wide gap between Maharashtra and the other two. While Maharashtra reported 292 deaths among healthcare workers, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu had 46 and 49 deaths, respectively.

Covid-19 Cases till August 2020

Covid-19 Cases till August 2020 edumantra.net
healthcare workers edumantra.net

3. A large number of infections and even deaths of healthcare workers in particular states is being viewed with concern by officials and public health experts, who say risks to frontline workers can jeopardise India’s fight against the pandemic. The issue, discussed in a review meeting headed by the cabinet secretary on Thursday, saw the Centre cautioning states about the need to protect a crucial resource. The possible factors responsible for high infections, officials said, were lax infection control in hospitals and the need for stringent containment measures in areas where health professionals reside to safeguard them.
4. Despite the high number of cases, the government has received only 143 claims since April under the 50 lakh Covid-19 insurance scheme for healthcare workers engaged in Covid mitigation activities. Official sources said the wide gap between the number of deaths and claims could be because all the casualties may not be eligible under the scheme. Besides, the claims are a bit slow in coming as families of the dead take time to apply and do the required paperwork.
 5. ‘Solidarity with health workers cannot be met with mere words of encouragement but by concerted efforts to strengthen the health workforce. Safety net for their families should be provided including a term insurance cover of overt 2 crore, with the government as sole guarantee,’ said Giridhar Babu, epidemiologist at the Public Health Foundation of India. ‘Protecting healthcare workers is of paramount importance to make sure we have a large enough force to take care of patients who need their services’ said Dr H Sudarshan Ballal, chairman, Manipal Hospitals, who said such workers may be at risk because of a large number of asymptomatic patients and lack of proper use of PPEs.                                    (Source: The Times of India/health Ministry)

After reading the comprehension passage, proceed to the questions that test your understanding.

(i) In the line “… risks to frontline workers”, the term ‘frontline workers’ does NOT refer to:
(a) healthcare workers
(b) police
(c) cleanliness workers
(d) teachers

(ii) Which state of India was on the top in terms of confirmed COVID-19 cases?
(a) Karnataka
(b) Tamil Nadu
(c) Delhi
(d) Maharashtra

(iii) Based on your understanding of the passage, choose the option that lists the factors responsible for high infection in healthcare professionals.
1. Careless infection control in hospital 
2. Negligency by healthcare professionals 
3. Lack of stringest containment measure 
4. The lack of healthcare professionals 
(a) 1 and 2
(b) 2 and 4
(c) 1 and 3
(d) 3 and 4

(iv) How many healthcare workers, infected with COVID-19, were there in Karnataka till August 2020?
(a) 11,169
(b) 12,260
(c) 1,07,100
(d) 15,213

(v) Choose the option that lists statement that is NOT TRUE.
(a) Maharashtra was the worst sufferer of Covid-19.
(b) Karnataka had less number of Covid-19 cases as compared to Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu.
(c) The deaths of healthcare workers are disregarded by officials.
(d) Most of the families of deceased healthcare workers received रु50 lakh under Covid-19 insurance scheme.

(vi) How many claims has the government received since April 2020 under the ? 50 lakh COVID-19 insurance scheme for healthcare workers engaged in COVID-19 alleviation activities?
(a) 49 claims
(b) 51 claims
(c) 46 claims
(d) 143 claims

(vii) ‘Healthcare workers’ refers to…………. 
(viii) On how many healthcare workers have COVID-19 tests been conducted in Punjab?
(ix) Lax infection control in hospitals is the main reason for high infection among healthcare workers. (True/False)                                                                   
(x) What does the term ‘concerted efforts’ in pars 5 mean?

Answers:

(i)(d) teachers
(ii) (d) Maharashtra
(iii)(c) 1 and 3
(iv) (b) 12,260
(v) (c) The deaths of healthcare workers are disregarded by officials.
(vi) (d) 143 claims
(vii) doctors, nurses, Asha workers, etc.
(viii) On 13,141 healthcare workers COVID-19 tests have been conducted in Punjab.
(ix) True
(x) The term ‘concerted efforts’ means ‘collective efforts’.

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Unseen Passage English 3: Reading Comprehension Exercise

1. Natural calamities generally bring death and disaster on a large scale. Tsunami waves, earthquakes, floods, droughts and epidemics have taken a heavy toll of human lives, particularly the children. The children who survive these disasters suffer the most. They are condemned to lead a life full of misery, insecurity, want and fear. Only the concerted efforts of the Government and the agencies involved in disaster management can help them lead normal lives again.

1,093 – live in general fear  16 – don’t speak  839 – fear water and sound  
110 – withdrawn socially  460 – can’t sleep at night  43 – become asthmatic  
20 – become deaf  21 – become blind  566 – have frequent headache and stomach ache   
1,164 – can’t concentrate117 – refuse to go to school276 – are in shock  

2. The natural calamities have tragically affected the lives of about 15000 children in recent years in India. The tsunami waves and earthquakes created havoc on a large scale. About 5430 children became homeless due to the tsunami and 5438 were the victims of the earthquakes. Floods displaced 2602 and droughts affected 2036 children. Epidemics affected 1313 children.
Out of these figures, 1093 children live constantly in general fear; 110 children have withdrawn socially; 20 children have become deaf and 16 of them can’t speak any more. More than 450 children can’t sleep at night while 1164 can’t concentrate on anything. The tragedy is that 21 of them have become blind, 43 asthmatic and 276 are still in shock. 566 suffer from frequent headache and stomachache. About 850 children fear water and sound and 117 have refused to go to school.

Natural calamities edumantra.net

3. Disaster management programmes have not Epidemic proved up to the mark and up to the task. The Government and the concerned agencies should provide comprehensive aids and help to the survivors, particularly the children. They must provide nutritious food, clothes, shelters and medical aids to them. MI efforts should be made to wipe out the scars left by these disasters.

After reading the comprehension passage, proceed to the questions that test your understanding.

(i) Based on your understanding of the passage, choose the option that lists the statements that are TRUE.

1.

Some people are hugely benefited by a natural calamity.  

2.

Natural calamities can have a life altering impact on people.  

3.

Natural calamities cannot have any adverse impact on environment.  

4.

Fortunately, there is no economy losses due to any natural cala-mities.  

(a) 1 and 2
(b) 2 and 5
(c) 1 and 3
(d) 2 and 4

(ii) What can make the lives of the children, affected with various disasters, normal?
(a) The concerted efforts of the government.
(b) The concerted efforts of the agencies involved in disaster management.
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) Neither (a) nor (b)

(iii) As per the histogram, the most disastrous natural calamity for children is:
(a) Earthquake
(b) Tsunami
(c) Flood
(d) Drought

(iv) The number of children suffering from frequent headache and stomach ache is:
(a) 839
(b) 1,164
(c) 110
(d) 566

(v) Who should be responsible for providing the disaster affected children with nutritious food, clothes, shelters and medical aids?
(a) The Government
(b) The concerned agencies
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) Neither (a) nor (b)

(vi) Which of these are the examples of natural calamities?
(a) Floods
(b) Tsunamis
(c) Earthquakes
(d) All of these

(vii) Who among the following are the worst sufferers of natural calamities?
(a) Elderly people
(b) Youth
(c) Children
(d) Adults

(viii) Natural calamities generally cause ………. on a large scale.
(ix) The role of Disaster Management Programmes in resolving the problems of natural calamities is very bad. (True/False)
(x) The antonym of ‘occasional’ in pare 2 is………… .

Answers:

(i)(b) 2 and 5
(ii) (c) Both (a) and (b)
(iii)(b) Tsunami
(iv) (d) 566
(v) (c) Both (a) and (b)
(vi) (d) All of these
(vii) (c) Children
(viii) death and disaster
(ix) False
(x) Frequent

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Case Study-Based Comprehension Passage – 4

1. Over 80% of fatalities in road accidents in India happened due to speeding and dangerous or driving a comparative analysis of National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) data since 2014 shows. While this careless corroborates the popular perception of how people drive on the road in a country where getting a driving licence is often said to b . be too easy. Experts said most of the fatal accidents are recorded by police under speeding and dangerous driving categories in the FIR as there are no other provisions in the Indian Penal Code (IPC) for such offences.
2. According to the latest NCRB report on accidental deaths, 83.2% of road fatalities were on account of these two types of violations and the rest 16.8% of fatalities were due to reasons including drunk driving, bad weather conditions and mechanical defect. In 2014, when such causes of fatal crashes were first compiled, 89.4% of the deaths were due to speeding and dangerous or careless driving as per the police records and this was the highest ever.
3. “We face a host of challenges ranging from poor system of issuing driving licences to almost zero scientific investigation of fatal crashes, which are provided in the law. Most of our national highways and state highways, which pass through villages, have no pedestrian crossings. On the top of this, in all fatal cases, police automatically registers them under section 279 (negligent driving resulting death) of the IPC,” said mad safety expert Rohit Baluja, who has been a regular guest faculty at Indian Police Academy, Hyderabad.
4. Confirming this, traffic adviser in Punjab, government, Navdeep Asija said in case of all fatal accidents, the provisions of IPC are slapped. “In IPC, any crime or offence has to be lodged against a human being and hence there cannot be any charge against a road, vehicle or any other object. That’s why police data may not indicate the exact reason of crashes. But it is also a fact that violation of traffic rules is rampant on roads and only electronic surveillance can put a check on them,” he added.

road fatalities edumantra.net

5.Baluja said there is a need to define what is dangerous driving and the norms for fixing speed limits. “In Delhi, the speed limit is same across major roads, Year residential areas and markets during day lean time and at night as well. No authorities are held responsible for deficiencies on their part,” he pointed out. Though the amended Motor Vehicle Act has included a provision to hold road owning agencies, contractors and consultants in case of fatal accidents due to faulty road construction or design, the government is yet to notify the process for this.                                                  (Source: Times of India)

After reading the comprehension passage, proceed to the questions that test your understanding.

(i) Based on your understanding of the passage, choose the option that lists accurate speed limit rules authorised in Delhi.
1. Different speed limits for major roads and residential areas.
2. Same speed limit for major roads and residential areas.
3. Same speed limit during day time and at night as well.
(a) Only 1
(b) Both 1 and 2
(c) Both 2 and 3
(d) Only 2

(ii) According to the latest NCRB report, what percentage of total fatal road accidents occur due to high speed driving and rash driving?
(a) 16.8%
(b) 32.3%
(c) 27.5%
(d) 83.2%

(iii) Choose the option that lists statement that is NOT TURE.
(a) Police data may not indicate the exact reason of crashes.
(b) Fatal accidents may occur due to faulty road construction.
(c) Violation of traffic rules is hardly observed on roads.
(d)IPC stands for Indian Penal Code.

(iv) In the line “……… the norms for fixing speed”, the word “norm” DOES NOT refer to:
(a) a model
(b) a standard
(c) usual
(d) exception

(v) As per the amended Motor Vehicle Act, who among these are also held responsible for fatal road accidents?
(a) Road contractors
(b) Road consultants
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) Neither (a) nor (b)

(vi) According to NCRB, which of these factors is/ are responsible for fatal road accidents?
(a) High speed driving
(b) Rash driving
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) Neither (a) nor (b)

(vii) In which year were the causes of fatal crashes first compiled?
(viii) According to the traffic adviser in Punjab government, any crime of offence must be lodged against……….. 
(ix) The data displays that the largest number of road accidents took place in 2016. (True/False)
(x) Which word in para 4 is similar in meaning to ‘observation’?

Answers:

(i)(c) Both 2 and 3
(ii) (d) 83.2%
(iii)(c) Violation of traffic rules is hardly observed on roads.
(iv) (d) exception
(v) (c) Both (a) and (b)
(vi) (c) Both (a) and (b)
(vii) The causes of fatal crashes first compiled in 2014.
(viii) human being only
(ix) False
(x) Surveillance

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Unseen Passage English 5: Reading Comprehension Exercise

1. There are visible signs of economic rejuvenation since the second half of May, with the second wave of the pandemic abating in most parts of the country and state governments lifting restrictions in phases, a finance ministry report said on 10 August 2021 while calling for sustaining the vaccination progress and the need for Covid-appropriate behaviour. “The receding of India’s second wave, along with rapid progress in vaccination, has set the stage to further accelerate economic recovery.
The movement of high frequency indicators in July clearly point towards a broad-based economic revival,” said the finance ministry’s monthly economic report for July, adding that these signs resonate with the fact that the economic impact of the second wave is expected to be muted.
2. It said PMI manufacturing sharply rebounded to be in expansionary zone across output and input sub-components of the index. Marking swift economic recovery, GST collection has reclaimed its ‘ 1 lakh crore-plus territory in July, signifying increased business and consumer activity. Rail freight at 112.7 MT in July hit a record for the month and registered 18.3% growth (year-on-year) and 13.2% rise compared to pre-Covid July 2019.
The surge in economic activity is further corroborated by trends in Kharif sowing, fertiliser sales, power consumption, vehicle registrations, highway toll collections, e-way bills and digital transactions, said the report. “Latest available data on growth of eight core industries, auto sales, tractor sales, port traffic, air passenger traffic, also indicate sequential improvement from the contraction induced by the second wave,” it further added.

economic edumantra.net

3. “At this juncture, the economy and society are at a crucial inflection point where sustenance of economic recovery, vaccination progress and Covid-19 appropriate behavioural strategies are needed in close synergy with each other.” It said that having antibodies reduces the probability of acquiring serious illnesses, as is borne by studies. So, any subsequent waves are expected to be mild in terms of severity of disease.

[Source: Times of India)]

After reading the comprehension passage, proceed to the questions that test your understanding.

(i) Why do you think the Indian economy is reviving now?
(a) The second wave of pandemic is coming down.
(b) Restrictions imposed due to Covid-19 are gradually lifted.
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) Neither (a) nor (b)

(ii) In order to control and prevent Covid-19 cases, which of these is must?
(a) Strictly following Covid-19 protocols
(b) maintaining the vaccination progress
(c) both (a) and (b)
(d) neither (a) nor (b)

(iii)  The term ‘Covid-appropriate behaviour’ refers to:
(a) maintaining appropriate social distancing
(b) wearing mask when going out of home
(c) washing hands with soap and water and applying sanitizer frequently
(d) all of the above

(iv) What does the line “… the economic impact of the second wave is expected to be muted” mean?
(a) The impact of the second wave Covid-19 pandemic on economy would be very disastrous.
(b) The adverse impact of the second wave Covid-19 pandemic on economy would be to a very less extent.
(c) The impact of the second wave Covid-19 pandemic on economy would be to a large extent.
(d) The consequence of the second wave Covid-19 pandemic would be positive for economy.

(v) Based on the passage, what would be the impact of imminent wave Covid-19 pandemic in terms of severity of disease?
(a) very serious
(b) enormous
(c) mild
(d) deadly

(vi) What does the GST collection of rupees 1 lakh crore plus territory in July 2021 reflect?
(a) Nominal business and consumer activity were done in July 2021.
(b) The condition of business and consumer activity was very bad in July 2021.
(c) Decreased business and consumer activity took place in July 2021.
(d) Increased business and consumer activity took place in July 2021.

(vii) Which one of these is an example of the term ‘year-on-year’?
(a) In March 2016, Aditi had received his electricity bill of 1540 and in May 2017, he received his electricity bill of रु450.
(b) In February 2020, I had earned 220,000, but in March 2020, I earned रु 15,000.
(c) In June 2020, Aryan had received his electricity bill of रु 1450 and in June 2021, he received the same supposed amount of his electricity bill.
(d) In May 2020, Sneha had spent 225,000 on household expenditure but in August 2020, she spent रु 30,000 on household expenditure.

(viii) Kiaan was vaccinated twice against Covid-19 virus. Which of the following statements is TRUE regarding Kiaan according to the passage?
(a) Covid-19 virus cannot affect him at all now.
(b) He may even acquire serious illness if he is infected by Covid-19 virus.
(c) If he is infected by Covid-19, he may become ill but his illness cannot be very serious.
(d) If he is infected by Covid-19, he may even die of it.

(ix) According to the Bar graph, approximately on the area of 600 lakh hectares the work of Kharif sowing was done altogether by 6 August 2021 in our country. (True/False)
(x) Which word in pare 3 is the synonym of ‘ensuing’?

Answers:

(i)(c) Both (a) and (b)
(ii) (c) both (a) and (b)
(iii)(d) all of the above
(iv) (b) The adverse impact of the second wave Covid-19 pandemic on economy would be to a very less extent.
(v) (c) mild
(vi) (d) Increased business and consumer activity took place in July 2021.
(vii) (c) In June 2020, Aryan had received his electricity bill of 21450 and in June 2021, he received the same supposed amount of his electricity bill.
(viii) (c) If he is infected by Covid-19, he may become ill but his illness cannot be very serious.
(ix) False
(x) Subsequent

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