Figure of Speech in Childhood Class 11 Hornbill In-Depth Analysis | Figures of Language

Figure of Speech in Childhood edumantra.net

Figure of Speech in Childhood Class 11 Stanza 1

When did my childhood go?
Was it the day I ceased to be eleven,
Was it the time I realised that Hell and Heaven,
Could not be found in Geography,
And therefore could not be,
Was that the day!

1- Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “When did my childhood go?”
Reason: This is a rhetorical question, as it is asked to provoke thought rather than to elicit an actual response.

Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “Was it the day I ceased to be eleven,”
Reason: Another rhetorical question, emphasizing introspection and reflection on the transition from childhood.

2- Figure of Speech: Metaphor
Exact Line: “Could not be found in Geography,”
Reason: This line uses “Geography” metaphorically to represent the tangible world, contrasting it with the abstract concepts of Hell and Heaven.

3. Figure of Speech: Epiphany
Exact Line: “Was it the time I realised that Hell and Heaven, Could not be found in Geography,”
Reason: This line reflects an epiphany or a moment of sudden realization, where the speaker understands the abstract nature of concepts like Hell and Heaven.

4. Figure of Speech: Alliteration
Exact Line: “Was it the time I realised that Hell and Heaven,”
Reason: The repetition of the ‘h’ sound in “Hell and Heaven” is an example of alliteration, adding a rhythmic quality to the line.

5. Figure of Speech: Antithesis
Exact Line: “Hell and Heaven,”
Reason: The juxtaposition of “Hell” and “Heaven” in close proximity creates a contrast between two opposite ideas or places, typical of antithesis.

6. Figure of Speech: Anaphora
Exact Lines: “Was it the day I ceased to be eleven,” / “Was it the time I realised that Hell and Heaven,”
Reason: The repetition of the phrase “Was it the” at the beginning of consecutive lines is an example of anaphora, used for emphasis and rhythm.

7- Figure of Speech: Enjambment
Exact Lines: Particularly between “Was it the time I realised that Hell and Heaven,” and “Could not be found in Geography,”
Reason: Enjambment occurs in this stanza as the thought continues beyond the end of one line into the start of the next without a grammatical break. This is especially notable where the line “Was it the time I realised that Hell and Heaven,” flows into “Could not be found in Geography,” without a pause. This technique creates a seamless continuation of ideas and contributes to the reflective and contemplative tone of the poem.

Childhood Poetic Device Stanza- 2

When did my childhood go?
Was it the time I realised that adults were not all they seemed to be,
They talked of love and preached of love,\
But did not act so lovingly,
Was that the day!

1- Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “When did my childhood go?”
Reason: This is a rhetorical question, used to provoke thought and introspection about the loss of childhood.

Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “Was it the time I realised that adults were not all they seemed to be,”
Reason: Another rhetorical question, emphasizing the realization of adult hypocrisy as a potential moment of losing childhood innocence.

2- Figure of Speech: Antithesis
Exact Line: “They talked of love and preached of love, / But did not act so lovingly,”
Reason: This is an example of antithesis, where two opposite ideas (talking/preaching about love vs. not acting lovingly) are juxtaposed to highlight the contrast and hypocrisy.

4. Figure of Speech: Irony
Exact Line: “They talked of love and preached of love, / But did not act so lovingly,”
Reason: This line also illustrates irony, where there is a significant difference between what is said or believed and what actually happens. The adults’ actions contradict their words about love.

5. Figure of Speech: Repetition
Exact Line: “They talked of love and preached of love,”
Reason: The line “They talked of love and preached of love,” uses repetition of the phrase “of love,” emphasizing the theme of love in both talk and preaching. This is not an example of anaphora, as anaphora refers to the repetition of the beginning part of successive sentences or phrases, not within the same line. 

6. Figure of Speech: Alliteration
Exact Line: “talked of love and preached of love,”
Reason: The repetition of the ‘l’ sound in “love” and “lovingly” is an example of alliteration, adding a rhythmic quality to the line.

7- Figure of Speech: Enjambment
Exact Lines: The stanza as a whole, especially between “Was it the time I realised that adults were not all they seemed to be,” and “They talked of love and preached of love,”
Reason: Enjambment occurs when a line of poetry continues beyond the end of a line, without a pause, and into the next line. In this stanza, several lines flow into the next without a pause, particularly noticeable in the transition from “seemed to be,” to “They talked of love…” This creates a continuous thought or argument across lines, contributing to the fluidity and the conversational tone of the poem.

Figures of Speech Poem – Childhood Stanza- 3

When did my childhood go?
Was it when I found my mind was really mine,
To use whichever way I choose,
Producing thoughts that were not those of other people
But my own, and mine alone
Was that the day!

1- Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “When did my childhood go?”
Reason: This is a rhetorical question, used to provoke thought and introspection about the loss of childhood.

2- Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “Was it when I found my mind was really mine,”
Reason: Another rhetorical question, emphasizing the realization of personal autonomy and independence as a significant moment in the transition from childhood.

3- Figure of Speech: Antithesis
Exact Line: “Producing thoughts that were not those of other people / But my own, and mine alone”
Reason: This is an example of antithesis, contrasting the thoughts of others with the speaker’s own thoughts, emphasizing the development of independent thinking.

4-Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “Was that the day!”
Reason: This line is a rhetorical question, reinforcing the theme of introspection and the moment of realization about the end of childhood.

4. Figure of Speech: Anaphora
Exact Line: Multiple lines begin with “Was it”
Reason: The repetition of the phrase “Was it” at the beginning of several lines is an example of anaphora. It’s used to emphasize the speaker’s introspective questioning and searching for the moment of transition from childhood to adulthood.

5. Figure of Speech: Enjambment
Exact Lines: Throughout the stanza, particularly between “To use whichever way I choose,” and “Producing thoughts that were not those of other people”
Reason: The flow of thought from one line to the next without a grammatical break is a characteristic of enjambment. It contributes to the fluidity of the poem and reflects the continuous nature of the speaker’s thoughts.

6. Figure of Speech: Synecdoche
Exact Line: “Was it when I found my mind was really mine,”
Reason: The use of “mind” to represent the speaker’s entire being or self is an example of synecdoche, where a part is used to represent the whole. This line signifies the realization of self-awareness and personal identity.

Childhood Poetic Device Stanza- 4

Where did my childhood go?
It went to some forgotten place,
That’s hidden in an infant’s face, That’s all I know

1- Figure of Speech: Rhetorical Question
Exact Line: “Where did my childhood go?”
Reason: This rhetorical question emphasizes the theme of loss and the elusive nature of childhood memories.

2- Figure of Speech: Metaphor
Exact Line: “It went to some forgotten place,”
Reason: This line uses a metaphor, comparing the loss of childhood to a journey to a ‘forgotten place’, suggesting that childhood is not physically lost but transformed into memories.

3. Figure of Speech: Synecdoche
Exact Line: “That’s hidden in an infant’s face,”
Reason: This line uses synecdoche, where a part (an infant’s face) represents the whole (childhood or innocence). The infant’s face symbolizes the innocence and freshness of childhood, suggesting that traces of one’s childhood can be seen in the pure and unspoiled features of an infant.

4. Figure of Speech: Imagery
Exact Line: “That’s hidden in an infant’s face,”
Reason: This line creates a vivid visual image of innocence and youthfulness, evoking the purity and simplicity of an infant’s expression.

5. Figure of Speech: Enjambment
Exact Lines:Throughout the stanza
Reason: The flow of thought from one line to the next without a grammatical or punctuation break is characteristic of enjambment. This technique is used here to maintain a continuous, reflective train of thought, enhancing the introspective and seamless nature of the speaker’s musing on the loss of childhood. It contributes to the lyrical quality of the stanza, allowing the ideas to merge fluidly from one line to the next.

Need our help or have some question