SILAS MARINER – Conclusion

By | November 21, 2018

The following page is dedicated to the executive Summary Notes and Extra Questions of SILAS MARINER.  The summary is designed like analysis of all chapters SILAS MARINER. These notes of the novel SILAS MARINER, and important as well as hard question answers, book summary, extra questions, explanation, long question answers, as a science fiction,  will surely help you to gain confidence. SILAS MARINER by George Eliot pdf downloadable file is also available. Kindly dive in for Conclusion of SILAS MARINER by the author George Eliot

CONCLUSION

Eppie was getting married at the Red House. She wore a pure white dress of light cotton with a tiny pink sprig provided by Nancy Cass. Summer was in the air, and most of Raveloe was present at the wedding, which included Miss Priscilla and the old Mr Cass, who had come to keep Nancy company. Godfrey, however, was called to Lytherly on business so he could not attend the wedding or the feast to be held afterwards at the Rainbow.

 After the wedding, the guests made their way into the humbler part of the village. As the procession passed, old Mr Macey said, “that his words had come true”. He had said that there was no harm in Silas and that he would get his money back someday.

During the party in front of the Rainbow, the guests discussed Silas’s history, the good turn he did for a lone motherless child, and the blessing that he was given because of his goodness. They all wished him joy and good luck, which they know he well deserved.

Silas, Eppie, Aaron and Mrs Winthrop decided to visit the cottage at the stone-pits before continuing on to the feast. They admired the new garden which was much larger than Eppie had hoped, and installed at the expense of Mr Cass, their new landlord. Eppie exclaimed “Oh father, what a pretty home ours is! I think nobody could be happier than we are.”

Q1. Describe Eppie’s wedding day.

Ans. The day of Eppie’s wedding was beautiful and warm. Eppie told Silas that she and Aaron would always be with him. She looks ethereal and angel-like in her wedding gown. The day of Eppie’s wedding is beautiful and warm. Eppie tells Silas that she will always be with him, and Aaron will be with Silas as well. She looks ethereal and angel-like in her wedding gown, provided by Mrs Godfrey Cass. MrLammeter and Priscilla accompany Nancy to the wedding. The only one, not present was Godfrey Cass, though it was through his generosity that the feast had been provided, that the wedding had taken place at the Red House, and that Silas’s cottage has been fitted with such a charming garden. There can be no doubt that Cass’s absence was scheduled intentionally, and his choice to be absent demonstrates his many remaining regrets. Money and property are his only legacy.

Priscilla wished that Nancy had a child who was as wonderful as Eppie. Both high-class society and the working class were there at Eppie and Aaron’s bridal party. Mr Macey was happy that he had lived to see Silas’s stolen money returned to him. The bridal party was all in agreement that Silas had brought a blessing to himself by being a father to alone, deserted child. Silas and Eppie declare that their home at the Stone-pits was the best place for them.

Eliot manages the tone of the conclusion to portray the outcome of the strange events at Raveloe. Eppie’s “very light” wedding dress accentuates her role as a bringer of hope — not just for Merrier, but for the community at large. The Lammeters and the Causes, though they play host to the happy occasion, do not partake in it themselves except as witnesses. Their day has come and gone, at least in terms of regeneration.

This final section shows us, at last, the garden that Eppie requested at the beginning of Part Two. The garden certainly represents the life, regeneration and spirit of nature that seems to be affirmed in the novel despite the ills of the world it also presents. Gardens express people’s organic nature and development, and this garden underlines Eppie’s own association with generation and growth. This connection is noted again with the tiny pink sprig on her wedding dress.

 The only one not in attendance in the conclusion is Godfrey Cass, though it is through his generosity that the feast has been provided, that the wedding has taken place at the Red House, and that Silas’s cottage has been fitted with such a charming garden. There can be no doubt that Godfrey’s absence was scheduled intentionally, and his choice to be absent bespeaks his many remaining regrets. Money and property are his only legacy, whereas Silas’s legacy involves these kinds of things and much more: a daughter associated with growth, youth and hope.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.