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Packing Extract Based Questions

Read the following extracts and answer the questions that follow in one or two lines each.

(I)

They’re taking it in the way they did irritate me. There is nothing does irritate me more than seeing other people sitting about doing nothing when I’m working.

 (a) Who is the speaker here and whom is he talking about?

Ans: The speaker here is Jerome, the narrator of the story. He is talking about his friends, George and Harris.

 (b) What does the speaker mean by ‘it’?

Ans:  By ‘it’, the speaker Jerome means the response of his friends to his suggestion for packing. Both of them at once left the entire task to him and stretched themselves comfortably while he struggled alone.

(c) What irritates the speaker the most?

Ans: The speaker is irritated the most when other people sit idle while he has to work.

(d) What work did the speaker have to do?

Ans: The speaker, Jerome had to pack the bag for the trip that the three friends had to go on the next morning.

(II)

However, I did not say anything but started the packing. It seemed a longer job than I had thought it was going to be…

(a) Whom does ‘I’  stand for?

 Ans: ‘I’ stands for Jerome, the author.

(b) Why didn’t ‘I’ say anything?

Ans: Jerome didn’t say anything as he himself had asked his friends to leave the whole matter (of packing) entirely to him. So now, he couldn’t argue or back out.

 (c) How did the job not match his expectation?

Ans: Jerome had thought that it was a simple job that would not take much time. But when he started, it seemed to be a long and a tedious one.

(d) Why did the job take longer than he had expected?

Ans:  The job took longer than expected as Jerome had to pack the bag for all three of them. George and Harris didn’t help him at all. On top of it, he had to unpack and repack it over and over again for one reason or the other.

(III)

 Harris said that we should be wanting to start in less than twelve hours’ time and thought that he and George had better do the rest, and I agreed and sat down, and they had to go.

 (a) What was ‘the rest’ that Harris and George offered to do?

Ans:  ‘The rest’ refers to the packing that remained after the bag had been packed. Jerome had packed the bag and now the hamper was left which has been referred to as ‘the rest’.

(b) Why did Harris and George offer to do ‘the rest’?

Ans: Harris and George had seen Jerome’s clumsiness while packing the bag. So, they offered to take care of the rest of the packing, lest the task became unending and their departure got delayed.

 (c) Why did Harris particularly mention that they had less than twelve hours’ time to start?

Ans:  Harris mentioned ‘less than twelve hours’ time’ as he felt that if Jerome had to complete rest of the packing, twelve hours’ time might not be sufficient for him to finish the job.

(d) Who does ‘I’ refer to? Why did ‘I’ agree to the proposal?

Ans: ‘I’ refers to Jerome. He agreed to the proposal as he knew well how incompetent his friends were. He wanted to see them fumble as they went about packing the hamper.

(IV)

I made no comment; I only waited. With the exception of George, Harris is the worst packer in this world; and I looked at the piles of plates and cups, and kettles, and bottles, and jars, and pies, and stoves, and cakes, and tomatoes, etc., and felt that the thing would soon become exciting.

(a) Who does ‘I’ stand for? What did he wait for?

Ans: ‘I’ stands for Jerome, the narrator. He waited for his friends to fumble and falter while packing the hamper.

(b) Why has ‘and’ been used eight times in the sentence?

Ans:  By repeatedly using ‘and’ the narrator wants to impress upon the reader that there was a never-ending collection of articles that had to be packed in the hampers.

(c) Which ‘thing’ would become exciting for the speaker?

Ans:  The ‘thing’ here means the simple task of packing the hampers made confounding due to the clumsiness of his friends George and Harris.

(d) Why was ‘the thing’ expected to become ‘exciting’?

Ans:  The thing was expected to become exciting because Jerome knew that Harris and George were inept in the art of packing. He was certain that the two of them would make a fool of themselves while trying to complete the simple task.

(V)

They did scrape it out at last and put it down on a chair, and Harris sat on it, and it stuck to him, and they went looking for it all over the room.

 (a) Whom does ‘they’ stand for in this extract?

Ans:  Here ‘they’ stands for Harris and George.

 (b) What does ‘it’ refer to?

Ans:  It refers to the butter that George and Harris were trying to squeeze into a kettle.

(c) Why did they have to scrape ‘it’?

Ans: They had to scrape the butter because they were neither able to put it into the kettle nor pull it out. Left with no alternative they had to scrape it.

(d) Why did they go about looking for ‘it’ all over the room?

Ans: When Harris sat on the butter, it had stuck to his back. Being unaware of this, they had to look for it all over.

(VI)

 If he can squirm in anywhere where he particularly is not wanted, and be a perfect nuisance, and make people mad, and have things thrown at his head, then he feels his day has not been wasted.

(a) Whom does ‘he’ stand for in these lines?

Ans: In these lines, ‘he’ stands for Montmorency, the pet dog of George, Harris and Jerome.

 (b) How did he become a perfect nuisance?

 Ans: Montmorency became a perfect nuisance by finding his way to the spot where he would not be wanted at all.

(c) How would ‘he’ make people mad?

Ans:  Montmorency would irritate everyone immensely so much so that his activities would make people lose their heads and they would hurl things at his head to shoo him away.

 (d) When did ‘he’ feel that his day was not wasted?

 Ans: Montmorency felt that his day was not wasted when he was able to irritate people and make them lose their temper by his destructive actions.

(VII)

Harris said I encouraged him. I didn’t encourage him. A dog like that doesn’t want any encouragement.

 (a) Whom does ‘I’ stand for in the extract?

Ans: In this extract, ‘I’ stands for Jerome, the narrator.

(b)  Whom does ‘him’ refer to?

Ans:  ‘Him’ refers to Montmorency, their pet dog.

(c) What sort of encouragement do you think Harris is referring to?

Ans: Harris believes that Jerome encourages Montmorency to get in people’s way and be a perfect nuisance. He feels that it is Jerome who is responsible for the dog’s irritating behaviour.

 (d) What impression do you form about ‘him’ from this extract?

Ans:  This extract suggests that Montmorency was a dog that had an inborn urge to trouble the people and make them lose their temper. He didn’t need anybody’s support to behave in such a nasty manner.

PASSAGE 1

I rather pride myself on my packing. Packing is one of those many things that I feel I know more about than any other person hying. (It surprises me myself, sometimes, how many such things there are.) I impressed the fact upon George and Harris and told them that they had better leave the whole matter entirely to me. They tell into the suggestion with, a readiness that had something uncanny about it. George put on a pipe and spread himself over the easy-chair, and Harris cocked his legs on the table and lit a cigar.

Questions :

 (i )Who does ‘I’ refer to in this passage?

(ii) What does the speaker consider himself an expert in?

(iii) Name the persons mentioned in this passage.

(iv) They had better leave the whole matter entirely to me. What is this ‘whole matter’?

(v) What do you mean by ‘fell into’?

Answers

 (i) ‘I’ refers to the author of this lesson Jerome K. Jerome.

 (ii) He considers’ himself expert in packing.

 (iii) Jerome K. Jerome, George and Harris.

 (iv) This ‘whole matter, refers to packing.

(v) ‘Accepted’.

PASSAGE 2

 This was hardly what I intended. What I had meant, of course, was, that I should boss the job and that Harris and George should potter about under my directions, I pushed them aside every now and then with, “Oh, you!” Here, let me do it.” “There you are, simple enough!”—really teaching them, as you might say. They’re taking it in the way they did irritate me. There is nothing does irritate me more than seeing other people sitting about doing nothing when l’in working.

 Questions :

(i) What had the author not intended?

(ii) What had he intended?

(iii) “Here, let me do it.” What does it refer to?

(iv) What irritates the author more than anything else?

(v) Name the lesson.

 Answers :

 (i) The author had not intended that he should work and George and Harris take rest.

(ii) He intended that he should supervise the job of packing.

(iii) It refers to ‘packing’.

 (iv) Seeing others. people sitting about doing nothing when he is working irritates more than anything else.

(v) ‘Packing’.

PASSAGE  3

I lived with a man once who used to make me mad that way. He would roll on the sofa and watch me doing things by the hour together. He said it did him real good to look on at me, messing about. Now, I’m not like that. I can’t sit still and see another man slaving and working. I want to get up and’-superintend, and walk around with my hands in my pockets, and tell him what to do. It is my energetic nature. I can’t help it:

 Questions ;

(i) What problem did the author have with that man?

 (ii) What can’t the author do now?

(iii) What did the author want to do now?

(iv) What is the author’s nature?

(v) Name the chapter.

 Answers :

 (i) That man used to make him mad.

 (ii) Now the author can’t sit still and see another man working hard.

 (iii) He wanted to get up and superintend, and walk around with his hands in pockets:

(iv). He has an energetic nature.

(v) ‘Packing’.

PASSAGE 4

When I had finished, George asked if the soap was in. I said I didn’t care a hang whether the soap was in or whether it wasn’t, and I slammed the bag shut and strapped it, and found that. I had packed my tobacco-pouch in it and had to re-open it. It got shut tip finally at 10.5 p.m., and then there remained the hampers to do. Harris said that we should be wanting to start in less than twelve hours’ time and thought that he and George had better do the rest, and F agreed and sat down, and they had a go.

Questions :

(i) What had the author finished?

(ii) What did he find when he had shut and strapped the bag?

(iii) When was the bag finally packed?

 (iv) What did George and Harris start doing?

(v) Name the chapter and the author.

 Answers :

 (i) The author had finished packing the bag...

(ii) He found that he had packed his tobacco-pouch in.

(iii) It was finally packed at 10.5 p.m.

 (iv) They started packing the hampers.

(v) Tacking’ by Jerome K.’Jerome.

PASSAGE 5

They began in a light-hearted spirit, evidently intending to show me how to do it. I made no comment; I only waited. With the exception of George. Harris is the worst packer in this world, and I looked at the piles of plates and cups, and kettles, and bottles, and jars, and pies, and stoves, and cakes, and tomatoes, etc., and felt that the thing would soon become exciting it did. They started by breaking a cup. That was the first thing they did. They did that just to show you what they could do, and to get you interested.

Questions :

(i) Who does `they’ refer to in this passage?

(ii) What kind of packers are George and Harris?

 (iii) How did they start their programme?

 (iv) Find a word from the passage which means ‘wishing’.

(v) What did they start packing?

 Answers :

 (i) ‘They’ refers to George and Harris.

(ii) They are the worst kind of packers.

 (iii) They started their programme by breaking a cup.

 (iv) ‘Intending’.

 (v) They started packing the hampers.

PASSAGE 6

They upset salt over everything, and as for the butter! I never saw two men do more with one-and-two pence worth of butter in my whole life than they did. After George had got it off his slipper; they tried to put it in the kettle. It wouldn’t go in, and what was it wouldn’t come out. They did scrape it out at last and put it down on a chair, and Harris sat on it, and it stuck to him, and they went looking for it all over the room.

Questions :

(i) Name the lesson and the author.

(ii) What bad thing did they do?

 (iii) What did George get-off his slipper?

 (iv) Where did they put the butter and what happened afterwards?

 (v) What were they looking for all over the room?

Answers :

 (i) ‘Packing’ by Jerome K. Jerome.

(ii) They upset salt over everything.

 (iii) He got the butter off his slipper.

 (iv) They put the butter on the chair and then Harris sat on it.

(v) They were looking for the butter all over the room.

PASSAGE 7

Montmorency was in it all, of course. Montmorency’s ambition in life is to get in the way and be sworn at. If he can squirm in anywhere where he particularly is not wanted, and be a perfect nuisance, and make people mad, : Ind have things thrown at his head, then he feels his day has not been wasted. To get somebody to stumble over him, and curse him steadily for an hour, is his highest aim and object; and, when he has succeeded in accomplishing this, his conceit becomes quite unbearable.

Questions :

 (i) Who was Montmorency?

(ii) When doe4 he feels that his day has not been wasted?

(iii) What is his highest aim in life?

(iv) Which word in the passage means ‘ego’?

(v) When does he feel succeeded?

 Answers :

(i) Montmorency is the pet dog of the author and his friends.

(ii) When he feels that he has succeeded in making people mad and have things thrown at his head, he feels that his day has not been wasted.

 (iii) To get somebody to stumble over him, and curse him steadily for an hour is his highest aim in life.

(iv) ‘Conceit’.

(v) When he thinks that he has troubled the people fully he feels succeeded.

PASSAGES FOR PRACTICE

PASSAGE 8

My tooth-brush is a thing that haunts me when I’m travelling and makes my life a misery. I dream that I haven’t packed it, and wake up in a cold perspiration, and get out of bed and hunt for it. And, in the morning, I pack it before I have used it, and have to unpack again to get it, and it is always the last thing I turn out of the bag: and then I repack and forget it, and have to rush upstairs for it at the last moment and carry it to the railway station, wrapped up in my pocket-handkerchief.

Questions :

(i) Which thing haunts the author while travelling?

(ii) What did the narrator begin to hunt for?

(iii) Why did the author have to unpack the bag again in the morning?

(iv) Which word in the passage means ‘give trouble’.

 (v) Name the lesson and the author.

PASSAGE 9

He came and sat down on things, just when they were wanted to be packed: and he laboured under the fixed belief that. whenever Harris or George reached out their hand for anything, it was his cold damp nog that they wanted. lie put his leg into the jam, and he worried the teaspoons, and he pretended that the lemons were rats, and got into the hamper and killed three of them before Harris could land him with the frying-Pan.

Questions :

(i) Who came and sat down on things?

 (ii) What happened when George and Harris reached out their hand in search of something?

 (iii) Why did he get into the hamper?

 (iv) What did I Parris do with the frying-pan?

 (v) Name the lesson and the author.

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