Chapter-8.1 The Trees- Extra Questions and Notes

By | April 26, 2019

Extra Questions, Notes, Assignment and study material for Class 10th as Per Latest CBSE Syllabus

Chapter- 8 English Language and Literature- First Flight (Latest 2018-19)

­­­­ The Trees

ByAdrienne Rich           

Adrienne Rich – A Short Biography

  About the Poetess                                                                                                                                    

Adrienne Rich was an American poet, essayist and feminist. She was born on 16 May 1929 and died at the age of 82 on 27 March 2012. ‘Of Woman Born’ On Lies, Secrets & Silence and ‘When We Dead Awaken’, are some of her famous works. In 1971, she was awarded the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America.

Introduction of the lesson- The Trees

INTRODUCTION

This is a poem about decorative plants. These plants are grown in houses for beautification. These grow in small pots and pans. They have taken the place of large forest trees which have been cut by human beings. This poem presents the picture of harm to nature by human beings by their actions.

Plot/ Theme / Central Idea of the Lesson/ Literary Analysis of The Trees/ Main Idea

Central Idea of the Poem

Adrienne Rich’s “The Trees” is a nature poem. Forest is the natural habitat of trees, birds and insects. In the absence of trees in the forest, the ecological balance will be disturbed. In this poem, the poetess has personified nature. Man has confined nature within his four walls. Man has uprooted trees and kept them in the modern artificial glasshouses. But nature can’t be subdued for long. The trees struggle to break the artificial bathers. They become free breaking all the bondages and move towards their natural habitat — the forest. Only there they can grow to the natural vastness, grandeur and dimensions. The poetess tries to convey that like human beings trees also need freedom. They can get their natural growth and freedom when they are in the forest and not in artificial houses made by human beings.

Style

The poetess emphasises the idea that God’s creation is a composite phenomenon. Trees, forests animals, human beings and other agencies of nature are interlinked. The poem has four stanzas of an unequal number of lines. The poem is rich in visual power. The use of personification ‘no sun bury its feet in shadow’ is quite effective. The use of simile in stanza 2, where ‘cramped boughs’ are compared to the ‘newly discharged patients’ is an effective poetic device used in the poem.

Summary in English- The Trees

DETAILED SUMMARY

Cat the poem ‘The Trees’ written by Adrienne Rich, is a poem about decorative plants. These plants are grown in houses in small pots and pans. They are not useful for birds and insects. Birds can’t sit on the branches. Insects can’t hide in them. They don’t give any shade. Their twigs are stiff. Their boughs are like a newly discharged patient. They are devoid of light. Their leaves rush towards the glass window for light because they feel suffocated in their small pots and pans. The poetess is sitting inside her room. She is writing long letters. It is night time. She feels the smell of leaves and lichen reaching inside her room. The poetess longs that these trees should strive to get light and air.

DETAILED SUMMARY (2)

1. Trees Moving Out: The trees inside are coming out. They are coming out of those artificial glasshouses where humans have so far confined them. The trees are freeing themselves from human bondage. They are moving out into the forest. The forest has been and will ever be, the natural habitat of trees. `The trees’ are metaphors for nature itself.

2. Empty Forests: Human civilization and progress have led to the cutting of trees on a large scale. Without trees, forests have become empty. There are no trees left now where birds can perch themselves on their tops. Even Insects have lost the places where they could hide inside them. There are no trees left in the forest where the red hot sun could find some cooling by burying itself in their shadows. However, the poetess is hopeful. The forest which remained ’empty all these nights’ will be full of trees.

3. Roots Work All Night to Free Themselves: The roots continue struggling all night. They want to free themselves. They try to come out from the cracks in the veranda floor. The leaves strain themselves moving towards the glass. Small twigs have become tough and hard. The long-cramped and crushed branches move repeatedly from one position to the other under the roof. These moving branches look like the patients who run out of the hospital in a hurry. Almost half-dazed, they move to the doors of the hospital to escape from it.

4. Poetess Sitting Inside: The poetess is sitting inside. Doors open to the veranda. She is writing long letters. But in those letters, she is not describing how trees are struggling to come out of their artificial habitat. They are going to their real and natural habitat. The trees are moving towards the forest. It is their real habitat. The night is fresh. The full moon is shining brightly in the sky. The smell of leaves and lichen is spreading out into the rooms. It comes inside like a voice from outside.

5. Head Full of Whispers: The poetess is sitting inside. The struggle of the roots, leaves and branches to free themselves from their artificial habitat continues. Her head is full of whispers. These are whispers of the struggling trees. Then, she asks us to listen to those struggling sounds. We will notice that the struggling trees have come out breaking the glasshouse. They are still stumbling but marching forward victoriously towards the forest. Winds rush forward to welcome the victorious trees. The trees have grown up to such dimensions that have even covered the full moon. Covered by the leaves and branches of the trees, the full moon looks like a broken mirror into many pieces. These broken pieces of the moon can be seen through the holes of the tallest oak at the top.

Main Points of the Poem

  1. The trees are coming out of their artificial glasshouses.
  2. They are moving out into their natural habitat — the forest.
  3. The trees are metaphors of nature itself.
  4. Without trees, forests have become empty.
  5. No trees are left in the forest where birds can perch themselves on their tops.
  6. Even insects have lost the places where they could hide themselves in.
  7. The poetess is hopeful that the forest, will be full of trees ‘by morning.’
  8. To free themselves, the roots continue working all night.
  9. They tire trying to come out from the cracks in the veranda floor.
  10. Small twigs become tough and branches move their positions under the roof.
  11. The night is fresh. The moon is shining and the smell of leaves and lichen is spreading out into the rooms.
  12. The poet is sitting inside but the struggle of the roots, leaves and branches continues to free themselves.
  13. The struggling trees have come out breaking the glasshouse and are marching towards the forest victoriously.

DETAILED SUMMARY in Hindi – The Trees

SUMMARY IN HINDI

यह कविता एड्रीन रिच द्वारा लिखित सजावटी पोधों के बारे में एक कबिता है ये पौधे घरो के अंदर फूलदानों और छोटे बर्तनो में उगाए जाते है ये पछइयो और कीटो के लिए लाभदायक नहीं है पछी इनकी शाखाओ के ऊपर नहीं बैठ सकते है कीट सोयम को इनमे नहीं छुपा सकते है ये कोई छाया नहीं देते है इनकी टहनिआ अकड़ी (कठोर) हुई है इनकी साखाये उस मरीज की भाति है जिसे हाल ही में अस्प्ताल से छुट्टी मिली है ये प्रकाश से बंचित है इनके पत्ते प्रकाश हाशिल करने के लिए शीशे की खिड़की की ओर भागते है क्योकि फूलदानों और बर्तनो में उनका दम घुटता है कबित्री अपने कमरे में बैठी है बह लम्बे पत्र लिख रही है रात्रि का समय है बह पत्तो और काई को गंद को अपने कमरे के अंदर पहुँचता महसूस करती है कबित्री की इच्छा है कि बृच्छ प्रकाश और हवा कि लिए संघर्ष करे 

Following is the complete question bank for The Trees

The Trees Extra Questions and Answers

COMPREHENSION OF STANZAS

 Read the following stanzas and answer the questions that follow :

STANZA 1

The trees inside are moving out into the forest,

the forest that was empty all these days

where no bird could sit

no insect hide

no sun bury its feet in the shadow

the forest that was empty all these nights

will be full of trees by morning.

Questions :

 (a) From where are the trees moving out into the forest?

(b) Why can’t birds sit in them or insects hide in them?

 (c) How was the forest ‘all these nights’?

(d) Are these trees useful for birds and insects?

(e) What type of trees are these?

Answers :

(a) The trees are moving out of the mind of the painter and coining on the canvas.

(b) These are not real trees. These are the trees in a picture or decorative trees in a house. So birds can’t sit in them and insects cannot hide there.

(c) All these nights, the forest was empty.

 (d) No, these trees are not useful for birds and insects.

(e) These are decorative or picture trees

STANZA 2

All night the roots work

to disengage themselves from the cracks

on the veranda floor.

The leaves strain toward the glass

small twigs stiff with exertion

long-cramped boughs shuffling under the roof

like newly discharged patients

half-dazed, moving

to the clinic doors.

 Questions :

(a) What do the roots do all night?

(b) How are the small twigs?

(c) What are the boughs compared to?

 (d) What do the leaves do?

(e) Name the poem and the poetess.

Answers :

(a) All night the roots work to free themselves from the cracks in the veranda floor.

 (b) The small twigs are stiff.

(c) The boughs are compared to newly discharged patients.

(d) The leaves strain towards the glass.

 (e) Poem: The Trees,

Poetess: Adrienne Rich.

STANZA 3

I sit inside, doors open to the veranda

writing long letters

in which I scarcely mention the departure

of the forest from the house.

The night is fresh, the whole moon shines

in a sky still open.

Questions :

(a) Where is the poetess sitting?

(b) What is the poetess doing?

(c) What does she not mention in her letters?

(d) How does the poetess describe the night and the moon?

 (e) How is the sky?

Answers :

(a) The poetess is sitting in her room.

(b) The poetess is writing long letters.

(c) She does not mention the departure of the forest from the house.

 (d) The night is pleasant and fresh. The full moon is shining.

(e) The sky is still open.

STANZA 4

the smell of leaves and lichen

still reaches like a voice into the rooms.

My head is full of whispers

which tomorrow will be silent.

 Questions :

(a) Where is the poetess sitting at present?

(b) Which smell is reaching her?

 (c) What is her head full of?

 (d) What will be silent tomorrow?

(e) Name the poem and the poetess.

 Answers :

 (a) At present, the poetess is sitting in her room.

 (b) The smell of leaves and lichen is reaching her.

 (c) Her head is full of whispers.

(d) Tomorrow, the whispers will be silent.

 (e) Poem: The Trees,

Poetess: Adrienne Rich.

STANZA 5

Listen. The glass is breaking.

The trees are stumbling forward

into the night Winds rush to meet them.

The moon is broken like a mirror,

its pieces flash now in the crown

of the tallest oak.

 Questions :

(a) What is happening to the glass?

 (b) What does the poetess say about the trees?

 (c) What rushes out to meet the trees?

 (d) How does the poetess describe the moon?

 (e) Why does the wind rush?

Answers :

(a) The glass is breaking.

(b) The poetess says that the trees are stumbling forward into the night.

 (c) The wind rushes out to meet the trees.

 (d) The poetess says that the moon is like a broken mirror.

(e) The wind rushes to meet the trees.

Stanza-6: (Page 99)

 The trees inside are moving out into the forest,

The forest that was empty all these days

Where no bird could sit no insect hide no sun bury its feet in shadow the forest that was empty all these nights will be full of trees by morning.

Word-Meaning: Empty— vacant, Insect— small arthropod, Bury— to hide the thing in the sand, etc, Shadow—shade,

Paraphrase

The tees are coming out of their artificial habitat—the glasshouses. They are moving out to their natural habitat—the forest. The forest has been empty of trees all these days. No bird could sit on the tree-tops now. Nor could any insect could hide in the cracks of the trees. The scorching rays of the sun had no shade of trees to cool themselves. The forest which has been empty without trees will be full of trees by morning.

Questions:

 (a) Where are the trees moving out?

(b) What was the condition of the forest all those days?

(c) What is the effect of empty forest on birds, insects and the sun?

(d) What will happen by morning?

Answers:

(a) The trees are moving out of the artificial glasshouses and going to the forest.

(b) Of late, the forest has become empty without trees.

(c) Birds can’t perch, insects can’t hide themselves and the sun rays can’t find shade without trees in the forest.

(d) By morning, the forest will be full of trees.

Stanza-7: (Page 99)

All night the roots work to disengage themselves from the cracks in the veranda floor.

The leaves strain toward the glass small twigs stiff with exertion long-cramped boughs shuffling under the roof like newly discharged patients half-dazed, moving to the clinic doors.

Word-Meaning: Roots— the extension of plants buried under the earth, Disengage— free, Strain— struggle hard, Twigs— small branches, Stiff- hard, Exertion — overwork, tiredness, Cramped- become hard, Stiff— hard, Boughs— branches, Shatter— moving about changing their position, Discharge— to grant permission Dazed- surprised, Clinic— hospital,

Paraphrase

The whole night the roots of the trees have been struggling hard to come out from the cracks of the veranda floor. The leaves have been hying hard to come out of the glass- house. Small branches have become very hard due to their overwork. Large cramped branches are shuffling under the roof as the newly discharged half-dazed patients are running fast to the hospital door to go out.

Questions:

(a) What are the roots doing all night?

(b) What are the leaves doing?

(c) What have small twigs become?

(d) What is the poetic device used in the last lines?

Answers:

(a) The roots have been struggling all night to come out from the cracks of the veranda floor.

(b) The leaves are struggling to move towards the glass to break open it.

(c) Small twigs have become hard with exertion.

(d) There is an effective use of simile when the shuffling cramped boughs are compared to the freshly discharged patients.

 Stanza-8: (Page 99)

I sit inside, doors open to the veranda writing long letters in which I scarcely mention the departure of the forest from the house.

The night is fresh, the whole moon shines in a sky still open the smell of leaves and lichen still reaches like a voice into the rooms.

Word-Meaning: Scarcely— hardly, Mention— to refer, Departure(here) going out, Lichen— a very small grey plant that spreads over trees.

Paraphrase

The poetess is sitting inside the house. The doors of the room open to the veranda. She is writing long letters. In that letter, she doesn’t describe how the forest is going out of the house. The night is fresh. The full moon is shining in the sky. The smell of leaves and lichen is reaching like a voice in the room.

Questions:

(a) What is the poetess doing?

(b) Does she mention the departure of the forest in the letters?

(c) How is the night?

(d) What is the smell of leaves compared with?

Answers:

(a) The poetess is writing long letters sitting inside her room.

(b) No, she makes no mention of the departure of the forest in her letters.

(c) The night is fresh and the full moon is shining in the sky.

(d) The smell of leaves and lichen is reaching the rooms like a voice.

Stanza-9: (Page 100)

My head is full of whispers which tomorrow will be silent.

Listen. The glass is breaking.

The trees are stumbling forward into the night.

Word-Meaning: Head- mind, Whisper— low soft voice, Silent— quiet, Stumble— struggle to walk,

Paraphrase

 The head of the poetess is echoing with whispers. But all these whispers will become silent the next morning. The poetess asks us to listen to the breaking sound of the glass. The glass is breaking and the trees are struggling but marching forward victoriously towards another forest.

Questions:

(a) What is echoing in her mind?

(b) When will these whispers be silent?

(c) What is breaking and why?

(d) Where are the trees stumbling forward?

Answers:

(a) The poetess’s mind is full of whispers.

(b) These whispers will become silent the next morning.

(c) Glass is breaking as the trees are forcing to come out of it.

(d) The trees are stumbling forward victoriously towards the forest.

Stanza-10: (Page 100)

Winds rush to meet them.

The moon is broken like a mirror, its pieces now flash in the crown of the tallest oak.

Word-Meaning: Winds— moving air, Rush— run forward, Flash— shine brightly, Crown— tile upper branches and leaves, Oak— a huge tree,

Paraphrase

Winds rush forward to meet the trees. The moon has broken into many pieces like a mirror. Only some parts of the broken moon can be seen shining through the top branches of a huge oak tree.

Questions:

(a) What does the word ‘them’ in the first line refer to?

(b) Where do winds rush to?

(c) What is broken into pieces?

(d) Where are the pieces of the broken moonshining?

Answers:

(a) The word ‘them’ refers to the trees.

(b) Winds rush to meet the trees.

(c) The full moon is broken into many pieces like a mirror.

(d) The pieces of the broken moon are shining on the top branches and leaves of the tallest oak tree.

MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS/ Quiz- The Trees

MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS

1. Where are the trees in the poem found?

 (A) in the garden                             (B) in the forest

 (C) in the house                               (D) all of the above

 Ans. (C) in the house

2. The trees in the poem are useful for :

(A) the birds                                       (B) the insects

(C) both (A) and (B) Ant                    (D) none of the above

Ans. (D) none of the above

3. What type of plants are mentioned in the poem?

(A) decorative plants                      (B) painted plants

(C) both (A) and (B)                        (D) none of the above

Ans. (C) both (A) and (B)

4. These plants are planted in

(A) pots and pans                            (B) garden

(C) fields                                           (D) forest

 Ans. (A) pots and pans

5. How are the small twigs of these plants?

 (A) soft                                                (B) stiff

(C) green                                             (D) all of the above.

Ans. (B) stiff

6. What are the boughs compared to?

 (A) a newly discharged patient (B) a newly admitted patient

(C) a chronically sick patient        (D) all of the above

Ans. (A) a newly discharged patient

7. What does the poetess write?

 (A) long poems                                (B) long letters

 (C) long essays                                (D) all of the above

Ans. (B) long letters

8. What is the poetess head full of?

 (A) plants                                           (B) birds

(C) insects                                           (D) whispers

Ans. (D) whispers

9. What tries to free themselves from the cracks of the veranda floor?

 (A) roots                                             (B) leaves

 (C) twigs                                             (D) boughs

Ans. (A) roots

10. Who is the poet/poetess of the poem ‘The ‘frees’?

 (A) Walt Whitman                           (B) Adrienne Rich

(C) Carl Sandburg                             (D) W.B. Yeats

Ans. (B) Adrienne Rich

Extract Based / comprehension test  Questions and Answers of The Trees

 Read the extracts and answer the questions that follow.

1. Winds rush to meet them. The moon is broken like a mirror, its pieces flash now in the crown of the tallest oak.

(a) Whom do the winds rush to meet?

 (b) How does the moon look?

(c) Name the poem and the poet.

 (d) How does the poet describe the moon?

 Ans. (a) The trees that are stumbling forward into the night.

 (b) The moon looks like a ‘broken mirror’.

 (c) ‘The Trees’ by Adrienne Rich.

 (d) The poet says that the moon seems to be broken like a mirror and its pieces shine in the crown of the tallest oak tree.

2. The trees inside are moving out into the forest,

the forest that was empty all these days

where no bird could sit

no insect hide

no sun bury its feet in the shadow

the forest that was empty all these nights

will be full of trees by morning.

(a) Where are the trees?

 (b) Why was the forest empty?

(c) Which three things cannot happen in a treeless forest?

(d) In the first line of the extract, the poet means to say that the trees are trying————

Or

(a) The birds do not sit on these trees because the trees are————

(b) The trees help others by providing————-

 (c) The trees are going ————-

 (d) The trees are not in their rightful place because————-

Or

(a) The figure of speech used in these lines is ——-

 (b) All these days the forest referred to here is ———-

 (c) You cannot see in a treeless forest.

 (d) The forest was empty because there were no———-

Or

(a) The trees are ‘moving’ here refers to———

(b) Where are the trees referred to in the stanza?

 (c) What things don’t happen in the empty forest?

(d) What does “inside” refer to?

Ans. (a)In a house.

 (b) Because all the trees have been shifted inside the house.

(c) No birds could sit, no insect could hide, and no sun bury its feet in shadow.

 (d) to move into the forest

Or

(a) in the house

(b) oxygen and shelter

(c) into the forest

(d) they have been taken to the house

Or

(a) Personification

 (b) empty

 (c) birds and insects

 (d) ‘Trees

Or

(a) the forests are again having trees

(b) In the house.

 (c) Birds do not sit, insects do not hide and sun creates shadows.

(d) In the house.

3.I sit inside, doors open to the veranda

writing long letters

in which I scarcely mention the departure

of the forest from the house.

The night is fresh, the whole moon shines

in a sky still open

the smell of leaves and lichen

still reaches like a voice into the rooms.

 (a) Name the poet and the poem.

 (b) Pick out the poetic device used in the stanza.

(c) The poet is busy writing long——–

 (d) The poet does not mention `the departure of the forest from the house’ because ———

Or

(a) The speaker is———

 (b) Why is the forest stumbling out of the house?

 (c) The poet is writing long letters sitting ——-

(d) “I” in the above lines is———-

Or

(a) She is sitting at a place where she could———- 

 (b) The trees are moving ———

(c) Who is `I’ in the given lines?

 (d) What does `I’ scarcely mention?

Ans. (a) ‘The Trees’ by Adrienne Rich.

(b) Simile.

 (c) letters

(d) everyone is sleeping and it was too sudden and unexpected

Or

(a)the Poet, Adrienne Rich

 (b) Going to the forest.

(c) in the veranda

 (d) the poet, Adrienne Rich

Or

(a) see the trees going out

(b) into the forest

(c) The poetess.

 (d) The departure of the forest from the house.

4. All night the roots work

to disengage themselves from the cracks

in the veranda floor.

The leaves strain toward the glass

small twigs stiff with exertion

long-cramped boughs shuffling under the roof

like newly discharged patients

half-dazed, moving

to the clinic doors.

 (a) Name the poet and the poem.

(b) What is happening?

(c) What work do the leaves do?

(d) The roots work all night to—————-

Or

 (a) The poet has compared the branches of the trees to—————- 

 (b) According to the poet, he presents a conflict between—————

 (c) Which figure of speech is used in the above-mentioned poem?

(d) Boughs were long-cramped. They are trying to————–

Ans. (a) ‘The Trees’ by Adrienne Rich.

(b) Trees are feeling suffocated in a house as they grow.

 (c) They strain toward the glass.

 (d) separate from the cracks

Or

(a) newly discharged patients

 (b) trees and patients or man and nature

 (c) Simile

(d) shuffle under the roof

5. The night is fresh, the whole moon shines

in a sky still open

the smell of leaves and lichen

still reaches like a voice into the rooms.

 My head is full of whispers

which tomorrow will be silent.

(a) What description of the moon does the poet give?

(b) What is smell compared to?

 (c) Which figure of speech is used here?

 (d) Name the poet and the poem.

 Ans. (a) The full moon shines.

 (b) Voice.

(c) Simile.

(d) The poet is Adrienne Rich and the poem is ‘The Trees’.

Extra Very Short Answer Type Important Questions

VERY SHORT ANSWER TYPE QUESTIONS

Q.1. What type of trees are described in the poem ‘The ‘Frees’?

Ans. Decorative trees are described in this poem.

Q.2. Where are the decorative plants kept?

Ans. The decorative plants are kept in the houses.

 Q3. Where do the decorative plants grow?

Ans. The decorative plants grow in small pots and pans.

Q.4. What does the poetess compare these decorative plants too?

Ans. The poetess compares these decorative plants to a newly discharged patient.

Q.5. Why can’t birds sit and insects hide in them?

Ans. Birds can’t sit and insects can’t hide in them because they are decorative plants.

Q.6. What do the roots do all night?

 Ans. All night the roots work to free themselves from the cracks in the veranda floor.

Q.7. What does the poetess not mention in the letters?

Ans. The poetess does not mention the departure of the forest from the house.

Q.8. How does the poetess describe the moon in the end?

 Ans. In the end, the poetess describes the moon like a broken mirror.

Q.9. What does the poetess compare the tree branches too?

Ans. The poetess compares the tree branches to a newly discharged patient.

Q.10. What rushes out to meet the trees?

 Ans. The wind rushes out to meet the trees.

Short Answer Type Important Questions

Answer the following questions in 30-40 words:

1. What is the central idea of the poem ‘The Trees’?

Ans. The central idea of the poem is the conflict between man and nature. A plant is brought inside the house when it is a sapling. But as it grows into a tree, it gets suffocated with the limited space available. So it departs to feel free. The tree is thus moving out to occupy the now empty forest, made so by man’s indiscriminate felling of trees. Humans must understand the negative impact of their actions on nature and mend their ways before it is too late.

2. Where are the trees at present? What do their roots, and leaves do?

Ans. The trees are in the house. The roots try to free themselves from the cracks of the veranda floor, and the leaves make efforts to move towards the glass perhaps in search of light. The small branches become stiff as they try to pull themselves towards the light.

3. Why is the description of the moon different in the beginning and at the end of the third stanza?

Ans. At the beginning of the third stanza, the poet says that one can see the whole moon shining in the open sky but in the end, the moon seems to be broken like a mirror and its pieces shine in the crown of the tallest oak tree. The change is caused by the shifting of the trees outside.

4. Justify the revolt of the trees and state two values which the man should possess to stop the revolt.

Ans. The trees inside the house get suffocated as they grow. They try to free themselves iron the cracks of the veranda floor and the leaves stretch out as if to move towards the glass. They are justified in their revolt. Men should learn the importance of trees.

5. How does the poetess describe the night? How does she feel?

Ans. It is night time. The night is fresh. In the open sky, the full moon is shining. The poetess feels the smell of leaves and lichen reaching inside the room. Her head is full of whispers. But she thinks that the next day these whispers will be silent.

Q.6. What is the theme of the poem ‘The ‘frees’?

Ans. The theme of the poem is the disappearance of trees. This poem also brings out the idea of conflict between man and nature. Man is doing more and more harm to nature. Nature is getting angry. Man’s existence on this planet is in danger. Thus it becomes the foremost duty of every citizen to work for the protection of the environment.

Q.7. Why are the trees described in the first stanza not useful for birds or insects?

Ans. The trees described in the first stanza are either decorative plants kept inside a house, or they are shown only in a painting or picture. Therefore, they are not useful for birds or insects. Birds cannot sit on their branches. Insects cannot hide in them.

Q.8. What happens to the roots and leaves of these trees at night?

Ans. The roots of these trees are engaged into the cracks of the veranda floor. At night, these roots try to free themselves from the cracks. The leaves try to move towards the glass. Twigs become harden and the boughs try to expand under the roof.

Q9. How does the poetess describe the growth of the trees inside the houses? [H.B.S.E. March 2017 (Set-D)]

 Ans. These trees grow in pots and pans. So their roots feel cramped. These roots try to free themselves from the cracks of the veranda floor. The leaves need light. So they move towards the glass. The twigs are stiff and the boughs are like the newly discharged patients coming out of clinic doors.

Q.10. Why does the poetess use the metaphor of newly discharged patients?

Ans. A patient feels depressed in a hospital. As soon as he recovers, he is eager to leave the hospital. He rushes towards the clinic doors. In the same way, the plants in the pots feel suffocated. They are deprived of adequate light. So they stretch themselves towards the glass door, in the hope of finding the light.

Q11. Why are the trees moving out into the forest?

Ans. In the poem, the trees are presented as a metaphor for human beings. As humans value freedom, nature can’t be subdued and controlled by man. The trees have been brought to the artificial glasshouses. The natural habitat of trees in the forest. Therefore, after a long and hard struggle, they are coming out of the artificial barriers. They are marching victoriously towards the forest which is their original habitat.

Q12. What will be the condition of a treeless forest?

Ans. No one can imagine a forest without trees. They are the life-line of a forest. Without trees, there will be no activity of birds, insects as well as of the sun. The birds will have no place to perch on. The insects will have no place to hide in. Even the scorching sun will lose the shade to cool itself in the absence of trees.

Q13. Why is the poetess hopeful that the empty forest will be full of trees by the morning?

Ans. The poetess is quite optimistic. The natural barriers to contain and subdue nature created by man will be broken. The trees which have been deprived of their natural habitat will struggle to free themselves from the clutches of man.

The struggle of these trees will not go in vain. By morning, they will be marching victoriously to the forest. The forest will be full of trees by morning.

Q14. Describe the struggle of the roots, leaves, small twigs and long boughs to free themselves and break open the artificial barriers created by man.

Ans. Every part of the confined trees rises in revolt and struggles hard to free itself. The roots struggle all night to break free from the cracks in the veranda floor. The leaves struggle to come out of the glass. Small twigs have become hard due to overwork. Long cramped boughs are trying to break open the roof and come out.

Q15. Describe the comparison between boughs and the newly discharged patients in the last lines of the second stanza.

Ans. Freedom is a common theme. The cramped branches of the trees put in the artificial glasshouses, want to be free. They are shuffling hard to come out in the open. They want to be free. Similarly, the newly discharged patients are impatient to escape to freedom. They don’t want to be confined to the beds of the hospital. They run towards the doors of the hospital to have a taste of freedom again.

Q16. Why doesn’t the poetess make any mention of the struggle waged by the trees to free themselves to move towards the forest in her long letters?

Ans. The poetess is sitting inside her room writing long letters. She is witnessing what is going on in her house. The struggle of the leaves, twigs, boughs and roots of the trees to free themselves takes place in her presence. However, she ignores such a historical event. Perhaps she is shocked and embarrassed by the sudden and unexpected happenings.

Q17. Describe the pleasant night when ‘the forest’ departed from the house.

Ans. The struggle was going on. The trees were struggling to depart to the forest, their natural habitat. But outwardly the night was fresh. The full moon was shining in the open sky. The smell of leaves and lichen was reaching into the room like a voice.

Q18. What are the whispers that fill the head of the poet?

Ans. The head of the poetess is full of whispers. These are the whispers of the silent struggle that is going on in her house. The trees have been waging a heroic struggle to free themselves from the bondage of man. They are moving to their original home — the forest. The poetess is a witness to all that is happening in the house.

Q19. Describe the sound and fury of the victorious march of the trees to the forest.

Ans. Now the silent struggle gets more vocal and visible. The trees have won their hard-earned victory. The artificial glasshouse that imprisoned them has been broken to pieces. The trees are stumbling forward towards the forest. Winds rush in to meet them. Even the full moon is covered by the full-grown up oak tree. Only a fragmented moon is visible through its expanding leaves and boughs.

Q20. Why is the full moon broken to pieces like a mirror in the last lines of the poem?

Ans. Previously it was a peaceful night hiding the struggle that was going on silently. The moon was full. But now the full grown-up trees like oaks with their boughs spreading out all around have obstructed the sight of the moon. The full moon is fragmented and partly visible only through the top boughs and leaves of a huge oak tree.

Q21. What is the message that the poetess wants to give to the readers through the poem ‘The Trees’?

Ans. Adrienne Rich uses trees as a metaphor for human beings, more particularly women. In a male-dominated society, women are in bondage. They are struggling to free themselves. Similarly, nature, represented by trees and forests, is struggling to escape itself from the onslaughts of man to destroy it. The victorious march of the trees gives a message of hope that nature can’t be tamed or subdued by the onslaughts and arrogance of man.

Q22. What changes can be seen in the moon during the course of the poem “The Trees”?

Ans. Initially, it was the full moon shining in a clear sky. Then the moon is broken like a mirror. Its rays fall on the top of an oak tree.

 Important Long/ Detailed Answer Type Questions- to be answered in about 100 -150 words each

Answer the following questions in 100-120 words:

1.’Departure is painful’. So is the departure of the trees painful for the poetess. What will happen after their departure?

Ans. Just like the departure of someone close to us is painful, so also is the departure of a tree. When they are planted as a sapling they look nice and enhance the beauty of our surroundings. But as they grow and spread out their branches, they look wild and require more space for their growth. The roots create cracks in the floor and the leaves stretch out as if to move towards the glass, perhaps in need of sunlight. The soft twigs become strong and stiff. So the trees need to be removed from the house. No more do the leaves cover the sky, but the trees breathe and they are welcomed by the wind. The moon resembles a broken mirror, reflecting off the leaves. The poetess reveals that she will feel lonely after the trees’ departure.

2. How does the poem ‘The Trees’ make a strong plea against deforestation?

Ans. The poem, ‘The Trees’ sends home a strong message against deforestation. At the highlights importance of trees when she says that if it’s the poem, the poetess indirectly it the 48 fees.in shadow. no forest, there is no place for birds to sit, insects to hide and the sun to bury played]. In shadow. As a sapling, the plant adds to the beauty of the surroundings when it spreads its branches, leaves and roots around. It gets the suit house. Grows, the hour But as it ‘depart, rated unless it is brought into the open. Thus, in the poem, the trees are said to tor -room the house to be welcomed by the strong winds and the moon. But there is no est.  Busted the house any more, as there are no trees. The poetess does not want to mention the departure of the forests as she feels guilty for merely looking silently at them as they depart. This way she subtly points out the thanklessness of man towards forests.

3. Explain the phrase “the forest that was empty all these days”. After reading the poem for whom do you think are the forests needed? Imagine you are a tree in a forest, who; values would you like the humans to learn from the tree? (100-120 words)

Or

What message does Adrienne Rich want to convey through her .poem, The Trees’?

Ans. In her poem, ‘The Trees’ poetess Adrienne Rich subtly drives home the message about the importance of trees. Without trees, the birds would not in a place to sit, insects will have no place to hide and the sun would not bury its feet in shadow. As saplings, we enjoy the beauty of plants as they adorn the surroundings. But slowly the tree spreads its roots, its branches and leaves and seems to yearn to go outside where it can live and grow without any restrictions No more does the tree look attractive indoors. The trees are however welcomed into nature by strong winds and the moon. The author hereby emphasizes that trees need to be kept alive, but should not be ‘imprisoned’ inside the house as they look more beautiful, and tend to thrive outdoors that is where trees belong.

Q4. How does Adrienne Rich use trees as a metaphor for men? Isn’t the struggle of the trees to free themselves and go to the forest is the struggle of crushed men, particularly of women against the powerful and atrocious men?

Ans. The poet Adrienne Rich uses trees as a metaphor for men, particularly struggling women. Nature, itself is represented by trees and forests in the poem. Man’s foolish and atrocious attempts to exploit, subdue, tame and control nature have led to disastrous results like deforestation. Forests have become empty. The futile attempt of humans to put trees and forests in the artificial glasshouses fails miserably. The trees, their roots, leaves, twigs and boughs wage a long and hard struggle to come out of the artificial barriers. Ultimately, the trees and forests reach where they should be. The victorious march of the trees to the forest tells the saga of nature’s victory over the onslaughts of man.

The liberation of the crushed and the women is based on the same theme. In a male-dominated society, women are struggling to come out of the clutches of men to gain freedom. It is hoped that like the trees in the poem, they will be liberated in the end.

Q5. The poem ‘The Trees’ present a conflict between man and nature. Describe the struggle of the trees and their victorious march to their natural habitat—the forest.

Ans. The poem ‘The Trees’ is based on the universal and age-long theme — the conflict between man and nature. Nature has endowed innumerous blessings on man. However, the greed, arrogance and foolishness of man have constantly tested the patience of otherwise peaceful nature. When nature can’t bear any more, it revolts and causes havoc on man in the form of storms, droughts and floods. Man’s greed leads to deforestation. Forests without frees have become a curse for birds, insects and even for the sun. This disaster can’t be redeemed.

Any attempt to subdue and control nature will end in failure. Uprooting trees from their original habitat, the forests and confining them to artificial glasshouses will end in failure. The trees rise against the onslaughts of men and wage a long and hard struggle to liberate themselves from the bondage of man. Ultimately, they are victorious. They return to their original home where they should be. Ultimately, nature asserts itself and repulses man’s attempt to exploit, subdue and tame it.

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