The Brook- Extra Questions and Notes

By | August 3, 2017
The Brook

Extra Questions, Notes, Assignment and study material for Class 9th 

Poem 1 Chapter- 6 English Communicative Literature Reader

­­­­The brook

                                                                         By Alfred Lord Tennyson

ABOUT THE POET- By Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) was born in Lincolnshire and educated at Cambridge University. He was the son in a clergyman’s family of twelve children. He was the Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom and remains one of the most popular English poets. He is the second most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, after Shakespeare. Being the representative of the Victorian Age, his poetry reflects the hopes and fears of the age and its conflicts between doubt and faith, and between religion and science. He published his first volume of poetry, Poems by Two Brothers, along with wit his brother in 1827. Among the best known poems of Tennyson are ‘The Lady of Shallot (1832), ‘The Lotus Eaters’ (1832), ‘Ulysses’ (1842), ‘In Memoriam’ (1850) and ‘Idyll of the King’ (1872).

Introduction of the Poem The Brook

“The Brook” reads like an autobiography of a brook. The brook describes the journey of its life from ‘haunts of coot and hem’ to ‘the brimming river’. The poem draws a parallel between the life of a brook and the journey of human life. However, the poem also shows a contrast between the shortness of human life and eternity of nature.

Theme/ Central Idea of the Poem The Brook

The poem deals with the consistent nature of the brook that keeps on moving towards its destination despite all hurdles (difficulties). It shows a contrast between man and nature with ‘For men may come and men may go, But I go on forever’. The brook seems to give a message to mankind to undertake the journey of life cheerfully. The men, like the brook, must overcome all obstacles and difficulties and move towards its ultimate destination.

Poetic/ Literary Devices used in the poem The Brook

Personification- It is a figure of speech in which non living things and abstract ideas are represented as living.

The whole poem brook is personified. Wherever  ‘I’ has been used in the poem it is ‘Personification’

  1. Poetic License

Hern is an example of Poetic License. The word ‘heron’ has been turned into ‘hern’ to match the rhyming word ‘hern’

  1. Alliterationis a stylistic literary device identified by the repeated sound of the first letter in a series of multiple words, or the repetition of the same letter sounds in stressed syllables of a phrase-

Examples-

  1. “Sudden sally” (Stanza- 1, line- 2)
  2. Twenty thorpes (Stanza- 2, line-7)
  3. Men may (Stanza- 3, line-11)Repeated many times in the poem
  4. “ fairy foreland” (Stanza- 4, line-19)
  5. with willow weed” (Stanza-5, line- 20)
  6. Chatter chatter (Stanza-5, line- 21)
  7. ………about and (Stanza- 6, line- 25)
  8. foamy flake(Stanza- 6, line- 29)
  9. golden gravel (Stanza- 7, line- 32)
  10. All along (Stanza- 8, line- 33)
  11. Skimming swallows (Stanza- 9, line- 42)
  12. sandy shallows (Stanza- 9, line- 44)
  13. Onomatopoeia- Onomatopoeia is defined as a word, which imitates the natural sounds of a thing. It creates a sound effect that mimics the thing described, making the description more expressive and interesting.
  14. Bicker- (Stanza- 1, line-4)
  15. Chatter (Stanza- 3, line-13)
  16. trebles (Stanza- 3, line-14)
  17. babble (Stanza- 4, line-16)
  18. Murmur (Stanza- 10, line-45)

 

  1. Inversion- also known asanastrophe, is a literary technique in which the normal order of words is reversed in order to achieve a particular effect of emphasis or meter.

Examples-

  1. By thirty hills I hurry down (Stanza 2, line 5)
  2. Till last by Philip’s farm I flow (Stanza 2, line 9)
  3. With many a curve my banks I fret(Stanza 4, line 18)
  4. And out again I curve and flow (Stanza 10, line 49)

 6. Repetition is a literary device that repeats the same words or phrases a few times to make an idea clearer.

  1. Chatter chatter (Stanza-5 , Line-21)
  2. here and there (Stanza-6 , Line-27)
  3. Men may (Stanza-3, Line-11)

 

  1. Antithesis means opposite and is used as a literary device to put two contrasting ideas together. This emphasizes the difference between the two ideas and adds interest to writing.
    Love, for example, is the antithesis of hate young is the antithesis of old.

Examples-

  1. Man may come and man may go (stanza 3, line 11)

(Wherever the above line has been repeated there is Antithesis )

  1. and in and out (Stanza 6, line 25)

here and there –  (Stanza – 10 , line 27)

  1. Anaphora In writing or speech, it is a deliberate repetition of the first part of the sentence in order to achieve an artistic effect is known as Anaphora.

Examples-

Stanza 1

I come from haunts of coot and hern

I make a sudden sally,

Stanza 4

I bubble into eddying bays,

I babble on the pebbles.

Stanza 7-

And here and there a lusty  trout

And here and there a grayling

Stanza 10

I steal by lawns and grassy plots,

I slide by hazel covers ;

I move the sweet forget-me-nots

Stanza 12

I linger by my shingly bars ;

I loiter round my cresses

  1. Asyndeton is derived from a Greek word as yndet on which means unconnected. It is a stylistic device used in literature and poetry to intentionally eliminate conjunctions between the phrases and in the sentence, yet maintain the grammatical accuracy.

Example-

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance (Stanza – 12, line- 41)

 

Some important Word Meanings – The Brook

Brook meaning in English- A small river stream , Haunts – places frequently visited by; Coot – a type of water bird with a white spot on the forehead; Hern – heron (another kind of water bird); Sally – emerge suddenly; Bicker – flow down with a lot of noise; Thorpes – villages; Trebles – high pitched tune; Eddying – spiral movement of water; Babble – sound made when one talks gaily; Fallow – land left uncultivated to regain fertility; Foreland – piece of land that extends into the sea; Lusty trout – a big freshwater fish; Grayling – another type of fish; Hazel – a small tree or bush with edible nuts; Forget-me-not – a type of flower; Shingly – covered with `mall rounded pebbles; Cresses – pungent leaved plant like a cabbage.

Download the Brook full poem/ lyrics Class 9 pdf

Moral/ Message of the poem the Brook

Just like the journey of the brook, human life also passes through many ups and downs, highs and lows. It has to overcome many hurdles and difficulties. Yet, like the brook, it must move on towards its ultimate destination. It should be as useful and fruitful to others as the life of the brook is. Human beings must learn to take joys and sorrows in their stride and keep moving ever onwards. That is the message that the poem gives us.

Short and Simple Summary of the poem- The Brook/ Summary in simple Words/ Critical appreciation of the brook

In this poem the brook (a small river stream) is telling its own story from beginning to the end. So it is an autobiographical note.  The journey starts from a secret place somewhere in the mountains which are home to birds like the coot and heron and ends by joining a brimming river near Phillip’s farm. It faces many difficulties but it never stops and never feels shortage of courage. Without complaints it keeps on moving and trying to achieve its goal.  Its journey has different stages, various ups and downs and different kinds of movements. In the same way there are different stages, ups and downs and movements in the human life but humans lose heart and accept defeat. The brook wants to say that man should be energetic, lively and fast in actions. It starts its journey with sparkling  and shining among the ferns (flowerless plants) because the sun’s rays are reflected off by it. It flows down noisily over the mountain slopes to reach the valley. On its way it passes by many hills, ridges, towns, villages and bridges. Its movement is swift, splashy, bubbly and noisy. The  poet shows it by using the words like “chatter”, “babble”, “sharps and trebles”. It quickly flows through hills, ridges, villages, a town and bridges.  It flows over stones and pebbles. The brook then flows by fields, infertile barren lands and a foreland filled with flowers (willow-weed and mallow). It undertakes a never ending journey and moves on to merge with the river. Generations after generations of human beings come and go but the brook is immortal; it flows incessantly. In its constant and forceful flow, the brook rubs away its banks. It moves stones along with it and makes rhythmic musical sound. Winding its way through cultivated and uncultivated land and forelands, the brook provides a home and breeding ground to willows, mallows, flowers fallen into it and fish of many kinds. As the brook passes over the golden coloured sand, foam floats over its surface. The brook sparkles like silver when it breaks into waterfalls. Finding its way through the forget-me-not flowers, the brook continues its journey. It goes on slipping, sliding, gliding, dancing and lingering. Swallows hunt for food from its waters and sunshine dances over its surface. Murmuring and moving it reaches the destination – a brimming river. When the brook comes closer towards the river, in the plains, its movement becomes slower, gentle, calm, quiet and soft. It flows smoothly by the lawns and grassy plots; and the hazel covers and the forget-me-nots flowers.  The brook comes to the end of its journey with the moon and stars being reflected in its waters. Despite all hurdles, eventually it joins the river. However its journey never comes to an end as it keeps on flowing continuously. Generations of men are born and they die but the brook keeps going on.

Go to the Brook NCERT solution

Point wise Summary/ Brief note on the poem

  • The brook originates from a place that is frequented by water birds like coot and hem.
  • In its initial stage, the brook makes a sudden sally and comes down noisily to a valley.
  • During its onward journey, it hurries down thirty hills, twenty villages, a little town and fifty bridges.
  • It makes different kinds of sounds at different places and times.
  • It ‘chatters’ over stony ways. It creates sharps and trebles.
  • It babbles on the pebbles and murmurs under moon and stars.
  • Even the movement of the brook keeps on changing.
  • It hurries down the hills, steals by lawns and grassy plots, slides by hazel covers and slips between the ridges.
  • Mostly it flows in a zigzag manner.
  • Men may come and men may go but the brook will flow forever.
  • The existence of man is transitory but the existence of the brook is eternal.

Download the Brook full poem/ lyrics Class 9 pdf

Line to line, stanza to stanza full Explanation, meaning, paraphrase and analysis of the Poem the Brook in Hindi. Find the meaning of each line

  1. I come from haunts of coot and here;

I make a sudden sally

And sparkle out among the fern,

                                                             To bicker down a valley.                                          (Lines 1-4)

मैं उस स्थान से पैदा होती हूँ जहाँ टिकरी (कूट) और बगुले जैसे पानी के पक्षी बार – बार आते – जाते रहते हैं | मैं अचानक ही एकदम फट के निकलती है | और फिर वहां उगे फूल रहित पर्णाग (फर्न) मे से चमचमाती हुई ,खूब शोर मचाती एक घाटी में नीचे बह जाती हूँ |

Paraphrase: The brook (a small river) takes its birth from a place which is regularly visited by water birds like coots and herons. The small river bursts out all of a sudden. Sparkling or shining through the flowerless plants or ferns in the sunlight, it flows noisily down to a valley.

WordMeaning :  Hauntsplaces frequently visited by, वो जगह जहाँ अक्सर जाया जाता है |  Coot—a type of water bird with a white spot on the forehead, ,टिकरी ,कैमा (पानी का पक्षी ) |  Hernheron, बगुला ,बक | Sally—emerge suddenly, एक दम फूट के निकलना | Sparkle—shine, चमकना | Fens—flowerless plant, फर्न,पर्णाग | Bicker down— (here) flow down with a lot of noise, शोर करते बहना |


2. By thirty hills I hurry down,

    Or slip between the ridges,

    By twenty thorpes, a little town,

     And half a hundred bridges.(Lines 5-8)

अनुवाद : मै तेजी से तीस पहाडियों में से बहती हुई , या (फिर) पर्वत श्रेणियों से तेजी से बिना दिखायी दिये , बीस छोटे गाँवों (खेड़ों), एक छोटे से कस्बे के पास से गुजरती , और पचास पुलों के नीचे बहती चली जाती हूँ |

 Paraphrase: The river hurries down through thirty hills. It slips quickly unnoticed between the mountain ranges. The brook passes through twenty small villages or hamlets, a little town and flows down under fifty bridges.

Word-Meaning:  Hurry down—flow briskly, तेजी से नीचे बहती हूँ | Slip—(here) flowing quickly unnoticed, बिना दिखायी दिये तेजी से बहती हुई | Ridges—mountain ranges, पर्वत श्रेणियाँ | Thorpes—small villages, hamlets,छोटे गाँव , पल्लियाँ , खेडे |

 

  1. Till last by Philip’s farm I flow

     To join the brimming river,

     For men may come and men may go,

     But I go on forever. (Lines 9-12)

अनुवाद : अन्त में मैं philip फार्म के बराबर से बहती हुई , किनारों तक लबालब पानी से भरी हुई नदी में जा मिलती हूँ | क्योकि मनुष्य (इस संसार में ) आये या यहाँ से चले जायें , लेकिन मैं तो सदैव बहती चली जाती हूँ |

Paraphrase: In the end, the small river flows near the Philip’s farm. Here, it joins with another river which is full of water—to the brim. Men may come or go (take birth or die) from this world but the brook continues to flow forever.

Word–Meaning : Till last—in the end, अंत में | Brimming—full of water to the margin, ऊपरी किनारे तक पानी से भरी हुई | Go on—continue flowing, बहती रहती हूँ |

4. I chatter over stony ways,

      In little sharps and trebles,

      I bubble into eddying bays,

      I babble on the pebbles.   (Lines 13-16)

अनुवाद : मै अपने पथरीले मार्ग से चहचहाती बहती चलती हूँ | मैं छोटी-छोटी परन्तु तेज और ऊंची आवाजें करती हूँ | मैं पानी के क्षेत्र में घुमावदार बहाव पैदा करती चलती हूँ | मैं कंकरों और रोडियों के ऊपर से मरमराती या सरसराती (प्रसन्नचित) बहती रहती हूँ |

 Paraphrase: The brook flows on making different kinds of noises and sounds at different places. It seems to chatter while flowing through its stony ways. It also makes sharp and high-pitched sounds and noises. When it flows in the spiral movement of water, its noise is lost. But when it strikes on the shingles and pebbles, it creates a sound as if it is talking gaily to them.

Word-Meaning: Chattera series of quick short high sounds, चहचहाती , चहकती  Sharps—(here) shrill and high-pitched sounds, तीखी और ऊँची आवाजें | Trebles—high-pitched sounds, तीक्ष्ण ,उच्चस्वर | Bubble—create bubbles, बुलबुले पैदा करती हूँ | Eddying—spiral movement of water, पानी का घुमावदार बहाव | Bay—(here) a part of the river,पानी का क्षेत्र | Babble—(here) sound of the brook as if talking gaily, छोटी सी नदी के मरामराने या सरसराने की खुशी भरी आवाज | Pebbles—shingles,  रोड़ियाँ,कंकर |

 5. With many a curve my banks I fret

   By many a field and fallow,

   And many a fairy foreland set

    With willow-weed and mallow. (Lines 17-20)

अनुवाद : मैं अनेकों मोड़ काटती अपने तटो से गुस्साते हुए चलती हूँ | मैं अनेकों खेतों और परती पड़ी जमीन के पास बहती चलती हूँ | मैं उन अनेक परियों जैसे सुन्दर भू – भागों में से बहती चली जाती हूँ जो समुद्र तक फैल गये हैं | मैं भिसे (willow) की झाड़ियों और मुश्कदानों के पौधों में से होती हुई बहती जाती हूँ |

 Paraphrase: The brook continues its onward journey flowing in curves and beating against its banks in fury. It flows through many fields and parts of land left uncultivated. The brook flows through those parts of land which extend into the sea and look like lands of fairies. It passes through bushes of willow and plants of mallow growing near its banks.

Word-Meaning: Curve–bend,मोड़  Banks—the two opposite sides, किनारे | Fret—show anger, गुस्सा दिखाती हूँ | Fallow—land left uncultivated to regain fertility, परती भूमि जिसका उपजाऊ पन बढ़ाने के लिए खाली (बिना बोये ) छोड़ दिया जाता है |  Fairy—of fairies, dreamy, परियों की , स्वप्न लोक जैसी | Foreland—piece of land that extends into the sea,जमीन का वह टुकड़ा जो समुद्र तक फैला चला जाता है |  Willow-weeds—bushes of willow plants growing near the brook, भिसे (willow) की झाड़ियाँ जो पानी के साथ उगी हुई हैं | Mallow—plants with hairy stems and leaves, रोएंदार तने और पत्तों वाले पौधों ( मुश्कदानों के पौधों )

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6. I wind about, and in and out,

    With here a blossom sailing,

    And here and there a lusty trout,

    And here and there a grayling.(Lines 25-28)

अनुवाद : मैं अन्दर बाहर होती हुई टेढ़ी – मेढ़ी बहती जाती हूँ | कई बार एक कली मेरे पानी के ऊपर तैरती दिखाई पड़ जाती हैं | और इधर-उधर एक बड़ी ट्राउट मछली या यहाँ वहाँ एक दूसरे की grayling मछली मेरे ऊपर तैरती मिल जाती है |

 Paraphrase: The brook goes on flowing in a zig-zag way sometimes shrinking and sometimes expanding. We can find a blossom sailing over its surface. Here and there we can find a big and fat trout and at other places we can find a grayling swimming in and out of it.

word-Meaning: Wind about—flowing in a zig-zag way, टेढ़ी-मेढ़ी चलती (बहती) हूँ | In and out—shrinking and expanding, सिकुड़ती और फैलती हुई | Blossom—a bud, कली | Sailing—sailing on its water, पानी के ऊपर तैरती हुई |Lusty—big and fat, बड़ी और मोटी |  Trout—a kind of fish, ट्राउट मछली | Grayling—another type of fish, एक दूसरे किस्म की मछली  |

7. And here and there a foamy flake

     Upon me, as I travel

     With many a silvery waterbreak

     Above the golden gravel. (Lines 29-32)

अनुवाद : और जैसे मैं बहती जाती हूँ यहाँ – वहाँ मेरी धरातल के ऊपर झाग बन जाता हैं | और जब मैं सुनहरी ककंडों के ऊपर बहती चलती हूँ तो उनके उपर बहुत – सी चाँदी के रंग की लहरें बन जाती हैं |

 Paraphrase: As the brook flows on, foamy flakes are formed over its surface. When it passes over the golden shingles and pebbles many silvery waves are formed over them.

Word-Meaning: Foamy—frothy ,झागदार | Flake—(here) piece of foam, झाग का फेन या हिस्साSilvery—of silver colour, चाँदी जैसे रंग का | Waterbreak—(here) waves, लहरें  Gravel—shingles, कंकड़ |

 

8. And draw them all along, and flow

To join the brimming river

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever. (Lines 33-36)

अनुवाद : उन सभी को अपने साथ धकेलते हुए मैं बहती हुई किनारों तक पानी लबालब भरी नदी में मिल जाती हूँ | मनुष्य इस संसार में आयें या यहाँ से जायें , (लेकिन) मैं सदैव (यू हीं ) बहती रहती हूँ |

 Paraphrase: The brook carries along with it all these gravels and foams and flows onwards. There it joins the big river which is filled with water to the brim. People may take birth and come into this world or die, the brook will continue flowing as usual. The worldly activities will have no bearing on its constant flow.

Word-Meaning: Draw—(here) push and carry them along, उन्हें घसीट कर साथ ले जाती हूँ |

 

  1. I steal by lawns and grassy plots,

 I slide by hazel covers

 I move the sweet forget-me-nots

 That grow for happy lovers.(Lines 37-40)

 अनुवाद : मैं घास के मैदानों और लानो में से चुपचाप बहती हुई चली जाती हूँ | मैं हैजल या पहाड़ी – बादामों की उगी हुई झाडियों वे बीचों बीच फिसलती निकल जाती हूँ | मैं “फॉरगेट-मी -नॉट” के फूलों को बहा ले जाती हूँ जो प्रसन्न प्रमियों के लिए उगते हैं |

Paraphrase: The brook flows silently through lawns and grassy plots. It slides through the bushes of hazelnuts. In its flow the brook sweeps away ‘forget-me-not’ flowers which grow for the happy lovers.

Word-Meaning: Steal by—pass silently,चुपचाप बहती निकल जाती हूँ | Lawn—grassy plots. घास के मैदान  Slide by—slip, फिसलना  Hazel covers—bushes of hazelnuts, हैजल (पहाड़ी बादाम)  की झाड़ियाँ Move—sweep away, बहा ले जाती हूँ | Forget-me-nots–types of flowers, फूलो की किस्म |10. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,


10. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,

Among my skimming swallows;

   I make the netted sunbeam dance

   Against my sandy shallows. (Lines 41—.44)

अनुवाद : मै चकमा देती, फिसलती, कभी उदासी भरे अंधेरे में और कभी सूर्य की किरणों में चमचमाती बहती हूँ | अबाबीलें मेरे पानी को छूती हुई उड़ जाती हैं | जब सूर्य की किरणें मेरे पानी के ऊपर पड़ती हैं तो मेरे पानी में फंस कर वे छिछले रेतीले पानी में नृत्य करने लग जाती हैं |

Paraphrase: The brook slips by silently. Sometimes it slides. It becomes dark and looks sad when passes through dark places. It looks bright and happy in the sunlight. The swallows fly over it touching its surface. The rays of the sun fall on its surface and are trapped in. The reflected rays seem to be dancing brightly in the sun against the sandy shallows.

Word-Meaning: Gloom—becomes dark,अंधेरी (उदास) हो जाती हूँ | Glance—(here) shining (in the sunlight),  सूर्य की रोशनी में जगमगाती हूँ | Skimming—passing along the water,पानी को छूती हुई उड़ जाना | Swallows—small birds with tails, अबाबील | Netted—trapped in a net, जाल में फंसीं | Sunbeamsrays of the sun, सूर्य की किरणें | Shallows—areas of less deep water, छिछले पानी के स्थान |
  1. I murmur under moon and stars

   In brambly wildernesses;

   I linger by my shingly bars;

   I loiter round my cresses. (Lines 45-48)

अनुवाद : मै चन्द्रमा और सितारों के नीचे रात में काँटेदार झाड़ियों भरे बीहड़ में कलकलाती हुई बहती हूँ | मैं अपने नीचे गोल – गोल कंकड़ जो मेरे प्रवाह में बाधक हैं , उनके ऊपर मस्ती से (सुस्ती से )बहती चली जाती हूँ | मैं तीखे गंध वाले जल कुंभी के पत्तों के पौधों के बराबर से घूमती चली जाती हूँ |

 Paraphrase: The river flows through the bushy wilderness creating a soft and low sound at night under stars and moon. It flows leisurely over the rounded pebbles which obstruct its pace and flow. The brook moves around cresses growing near its bank.

 

Word-Meaning: Murmurspeaking in a soft low voice. कलकलाना , मरमराना | Brambly—thorny (bushes etc.),काँटेदार (झाड़ी) | Wilderness—wasteland, बंजर भूमि | Linger by—flow leisurely, मजे-मजे , सुस्ती से बहती चलती हूँ |  Shingly—covered with small and rounded pebbles, गोल – गोल छोटी कंकड़ो से ढकी | Bars—hurdles, बाधाएं |  Loiter—move about aimlessly,बिना प्रयोजन के घूमना | Cresses—pungent leaved green plants like cabbage, गोभी जेसे तीखी सुगंघ के हरे पत्ते वाले पौधे |
  1. And out again I curve and flow

   To join the brimming river,

   For men may come and men may go,

   But I go on forever.  (Lines 49-52)

अनुवाद : और फिर मैं बाहर निकल कर मुड़ती और बहती हुई उस बड़ी नदी में जो किनारों तक लबालब पानी से भरी हैं , में मिलने के लिए चली आती हूँ | क्योंकि मनुष्य चाहे इस संसार में जन्म लेने के लिये आयें या मरकर इससे बाहर चले जायें , तो सदैव यूँ ही बहती रहूँगी |

The Brook Exercises are also available on ‘edumantra.net’

Line to line Explanation and analysis of the Poem the Brook in English. It could be taken as line by line summary.

(I)

I come from haunts of coot and hem;

I make a sudden sally

And sparkle out among the fern,

To bicker down a valley.

Coming down from the habitat of water birds like coot and herons, the brook emerges suddenly from a high plateau and falls and flows down a valley. making a lot of noise as it does so. it moves on through the fem that grows along its banks and reflects the sunlight thus creating a dazzling effect.

II

By thirty hills I hurry down,

Or slip between the ridges,

By twenty thorpes, a little town,

And half a hundred bridges .

 The brook’s journey being a long and a tedious one, it passes by many kills, ridges, villages and a number of bridges with great speed. No obstruction is capable of stopping it.

 

III

Till last by Philip’s farm I flow

To join the brimming river,

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever.

At long last, it reaches the plains. However its journey continues as it moves on towards its ultimate goal of merging into the river overflowing with water. Generations after generations of human beings are born and they perish but the brook’s incessant journey is never ending.

IV

I chatter over stony ways,

In little sharps and trebles,

I bubble into eddying bays,

I babble on the pebbles.

 As the brook moves, its swift current strikes against the pebbles and stones under it producing a tremendous noise. Thus the brook seems to be ‘talking’ as it moves. Also its rapid spiral movement creates spirals of bubbles and it sounds very cheerful.

 (V)

With many a curve my banks I fret

By many a field and fallow,

And many a fairy foreland set

With willow-weed and mallow.

The brook rubs against its banks angrily and flows by cultivated and uncultivated pieces of land. it also flows by the land extending into the sea providing home and breeding ground to willows and mallows.

(VI)

 I chatter, chatter, as I flow

To join the brimming river,

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever.

The brook flows noisily with a single track mind to become one with the river °yellowing with water. The human if being short-lived, generation after generation keeps on appearing and disappearing but the brook moves on eternally.

 (VII)

I wind about, and in and out,

With here a blossom sailing,

And here and there a lusty trout,

And here and there a grayling,

 The brook moves in a curved and winding manner and is full of life in the sense that it is lively and sprightly in its movement It carries with it the blossoms that happen to fall into it from the trees growing along its banks, and fish of many varieties.

 (VIII)

And here and there a foamy flake

Upon me, as I travel

With many a silvery waterbreak

Above the golden gravel,

Clusters of foam float over the brook’s surface as it goes advancing in its journey. As it passes over beds of sand with a tinge of golden colour, the brook sparkles like silver as its smooth flow is obstructed.

 (IX)

And draw them all along, and flow

To Join the brimming river

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on for ever.

 The brook carries along whatever comes its way because it moves on with a single track mind to become a part of the river in space. Unlike human beings, it has an eternal life.

 (X)

I steal by lawns and grassy plots,

I slide by hazel covers

I move the sweet forget-me-nots

That grow for happy lovers.

Very quietly and stealthily, the brook flows through grassy lawns and plots and .% gracefully moves on by clusters of hazel nut trees. As it advinces it sways th, forget-me-not plants and flowers that give joy to the lovers.’

 (XI)

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,

Among my skimming swallows;

I make the netted sunbeam dance

Against my sandy shallows.

 Moving on quietly and gracefully, the brook sometimes looks gloomy and sometimes bright and cheerful. Swallows fish out their food from its waters and the sunbeams dance over its surface while the sandy bed peeps through its shallow waters.

(XII)

I murmur under moon and stars

In brambly wildernesses;

I linger by my shingly bars;

I loiter round my cresses;

 Here the brook slows down and its splashy noise changes into a gentle murmur. I t makes a whispering sound as it flows in the moon and star light, through the thorny bushes growing in deserted places. It moves on very leisurely as it flows over bars of sand and pebbles. I glows around the plants that grow in its way.

 (XIII)

And out again I curve and flow

To join the brimming river,

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever.

 Finding its way out round the plants,  the brook flows on to unite with the overflowing river. Generations of men are born and perish but the brook’s life never comes to an end. It moves on and on.

Go to the brook NCERT solution/ Ncert exercise solution

Following is the complete question bank for brook

Multiple choice Answer Type Questions (MCQ Based Questions of The Brook)-

On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions by ticking the correct choice.

(a) The message of the poem is that the life of a brook is __________.

(i) temporary                 (ii) short-lived                     (iii) eternal                          (iv) momentary

Ans : (a) (iii) eternal

(b) The poet draws a parallel between the journey of the brook and __________.

(i) the life of a man                                                                          (ii) the death of a man

(iii) the difficulties in a man’s life                                               (iv) the endless talking of human beings

Ans : (a) (i) the life of a man

(c) The poem is narrated in the first person by the brook. This figure of speech is __________.

(i) Personification                            (ii) Metaphor                                     (iii) Simile                             (iv) Transferred epithet

Ans : (a) (i) Personification

(d) In the poem, below mentioned lines : “And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling” suggest that 

(i) the brook is a source of life.                                                                   (ii) people enjoy the brook.

(iii) fishes survive because of water.                                                       (iv) the brook witnesses all kinds of scenes.

Ans : (a) (i) the brook is a source of life.

 Download The Brook Worksheet (Will be available soon)

 STANZAS FOR COMPREHENSION/ Extract Based Questions– CLASS IX THE BROOK.

Read the following extracts and answer the questions that follow in one or two lines.

(I)

I come from haunts of coot and hern;

I make a sudden sally

And sparkle out among the fern,

To bicker down a valley.

(a)        Who or what is ‘I’ in the above lines? Where does it come from?

Ans.    ‘I’ stands for the ‘brook’. It originates from the areas which are inhabited by water birds like coot and hern.

(b)       What do these lines tell you about the way the speaker moves?

Ans.    The brook emerges suddenly    from a high plateau and falls and flows down a valley, making a lot of noise as it does so. It moves on through the fern with its water sparkling.

(c)        Name a poetic device used in the first line.

Ans.    Alliteration. – I come from haunts of coot and hem. The ‘c’ sound and ‘h’ sound have been repeated.

(d)       Bring out two characteristics of ‘I’ as given in the stanza.

Ans.    ‘I’ is sparkling and noisy. It seems to be full of life.

(e)       Which poetic device in the stanza makes the poet use the pronoun ‘I’ for the brook?

Ans.    Giving the attributes of a living human being to the brook, the poet has personified it. Hence the pronoun ‘I’ has been used for it.

(f) What is the rhyme scheme in these lines?

Ans.    The rhyme scheme in these lines is ab, ab.

(g) Explain: ‘Make a sudden sally’.

Ans.    It means: emerging suddenly.

(h) Find a word in the passage which means: flowing down with a lot of noise.

Ans.    bicker.

(I) Name the poem and the poet of these lines.

Ans.    Poem — The Brook Poet — Lord Alfred Tennyson

(J) According to the stanza, where does the brook originate from?

Ans.    The brook originates from a place which is regularly visited by water birds like coots and herons.

(K) What do you mean by ‘sudden sally’? Which literary devices are used in the above lines?

Ans.    ‘Sudden sally’ means emerge suddenly. The literary devices used in the above lines are:

  1. Personification: I come from haunts of coot and hern
  2. Alliteration: Sudden sally

(L)        What is the meaning of ‘bicker down’? Why does the poet use this word here?

Ans.    “Bicker” means to quarrel. The brook makes a noise which can be compared to the sound of quarrelling as it flows down into a valley.

(M)      What makes the brook ‘sparkle’? or

How does the brook sparkle?

Ans.    The brook sparkles as the sunlight which falls on it is reflected back.

(ll)

By thirty hills I hurry down,

Or slip between the ridges,

By twenty thorpes, a little town,

And half a hundred bridges .

(a)        What places or landmarks does the brook pass by?       OR

What are the things which come in its way?

Ans.    The brook passes by hills, ridges, villages and a little town. All along the way, there are scores of bridges it passes under.

(b)       How does the brook slip between the ridges?

Ans.    Flowing down numerous hills with a great speed, the brook makes its way through the ridges and moves on without interruption.

(c)        What idea do you get about the brook’s journey from the above lines?

Ans.    We come to know that the journey is excessively lengthy and the brook is equally hard working and determined.

(d)       What do you learn about the brook’s movement?

Ans.    The brook moves very fast and swiftly. It has a great sense of urgency in reaching its destination. No obstruction is capable of stopping it.

(e)      What is the significance of the number words in the lines?

Ans.    The reference to thirty hills, twenty villages and half a hundred bridges shows the brook comes across numerous hills, villages and bridges in the course of its journey. These numbers have been mentioned to give the reader an idea of the long journey of the brook.

(f)        What is the poetic device used in ‘twenty … town?’

Ans.    ‘Alliteration’ is used as a poetic device in these lines.

(g) Explain: ‘By twenty thorpses’.

Ans.The brook flows through twenty small villages or hamlets.

(h) What is the movement of the brook in these lines?

Ans. These lines present the fast movement of the brook.

 (i) How does the brook flow through the hills?

Ans. it passes through various hills meeting different odds which affect its smooth movements.

(j) What is the brook’s destination?

Ans. Brook’s final destination is a brimming river.

(k)        Why is the brook said to slip between the ridges?

Ans.    The brook glides noiselessly between the mountain ridges.

(l)         What are thorpes?

Ans.    Thorpes are villages.

(m)      What is the poetic device used in the first line of this stanza?

Ans.    The poetic device used in this stanza is personification. The river is described as hurrying down.

(III)

Till last by Philip’s farm I flow

To join the brimming river,

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever.

(a)        What is the significance of the word ‘last’ in the stanza?

Ans.    It having covered a long and a tedious journey, the brook reaches the point which would lead it to the final destination. Hence, this point named as Philip’s farm has been referred to as the ‘last’ point.

(b)       What is the brook’s ultimate aim?

Ans.    The brook aims at joining the brimming river.

(c)        Bring out a contrast between man’s life and a brook’s life.

Ans.    Man’s life as compared to that of the brook is very short-lived. The brook’s life seems to be eternal (everlasting).

(d)       Although, not a living character, the brook refers to itself as ‘I’. What poetic device makes such a use of pronoun possible?

Ans.    Personification.

(e)       What is ‘the brimming river’?

Ans.    ‘The brimming river’ is a big river filled to the brim with water.

(f)        Explain: ‘Men may come and men may go’.

Ans.    It means that men may take birth or die and depart from the world.

 (g)       Quote the line that shows the eternal flow of the river.

Ans.    ‘But I go on forever’.

(h)       Where is Philip’s farm situated?

Ans.    Philip’s farm is situated close to the river into which the brook finally merges.

(i)         What poetic device is used here?

Ans.    The poetic device used here is Personification/Refrain.

(j)         Where does the brook come from?

Ans.    The brook comes from the mountains where coots and herons live.

 (k)       The poet has repeated certain lines in the poem. What is this repetition called?

Ans.    This repetition in certain lines of the poem is called refrain.

`(IV)

I chatter over stony ways,

In little sharps and trebles,

I bubble into eddying bays,

I babble on the pebbles.

(a)        Bring out the significance of the word ‘chatter’.

Ans.    As the brook moves, its swift current strikes against the pebbles and stones under it producing a sound. Thus the brook seems to be ‘talking’ as it moves. Hence the word ‘chatter’ gives the brook ‘ the characteristics of a living being.

(b)       As described in these lines, how does the brook move? OR

How does the brook flow over stony ways?

Ans.    Here the brook moves in whirls and swirls. Its rapid spiral movement, caused by the underlying stones, produces bubbles and eddies.

(c)        What is the state of mind of the brook as it flows towards the river?

Ans.    The brook seems to be in a very cheerful mood. It is in a state of excitement as it is flowing happily towards the river that it is looking forward to join.

(d)       Apart from personification, what other poetic device has been used in the last two lines of the stanza?

Ans.    The poet has made use of alliteration in the last two lines of the stanza.

(e)       Give two words in the passage showing high-pitched sounds.

Ans.    ‘Sharps and trebles’ are the two words that represent high-pitched sounds.

 (f)       Where does the brook make spiral movement?

Ans.    The brook makes spiral movement on the pebbles.

(g)        What does the word ‘chatter’ mean?

Ans.    The word ‘chatter’ means to talk quickly in a friendly way, without stopping. The             brook too makes such kind of noise while flowing.

(h)       What is the rhyme scheme used by the poet in these lines?

Ans.    The rhyme scheme used by the poet in these lines is ab ab.

(i)         Describe the movement of the brook in these lines.

Ans.    The movement of the brook is never in a straight line. It flows in a zigzag way finding    its own course.

(j)         Explain: “I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles”?

Ans.    The brook makes a musical sound as it moves over small pebbles and large stones.

(k)        What are eddies?

Ans.    Eddies are whirlpools created by the circular movement of the current.

(l)         Name some of the poetic devices used in the stanza?

Ans.    The poetic devices used are onomatopoeia, personification and alliteration.

(V)

With many a curve my banks I fret

By many a field and fallow,

And many a fairy foreland set

With willow-weed and mallow

(a)        What does the word ‘fret’ mean? How does the brook ‘fret’ its banks?

Ans.    The word ‘fret’ means wear or consume by gnawing or rubbing. The swift and curved movement of its water wears and consumes the brook’s sandy banks.

(b)       What literary device has been used in these lines? Give example(s).

Ans.    Alliteration.  In the first three lines ‘f sound is repeated in the fret, field, fallow ,

fairy and foreland. There is a repetition of ‘w’ sound in the last line. With willow-weed and mallow.

 (c)       What is the meaning of the expression ‘my bank I fret?’

Ans.    The brook beats its bank angrily.

(d)       What is the figure of speech used in the first line?

Ans.    The figure of speech used in the first line is ‘personification’.

(e)       What is the poetic device used in the second and the third lines?

Ans.    Alliteration’ is the poetic device that is used in the second and the third lines.

(f)        Why has the word ‘many’ been repeated thrice in the stanza?

Ans.    The repetition of the word ‘many’ signifies the extent of the brook’s journey where it comes across countless landmarks.

(g)        What is the rhyme scheme of this stanza?

Ans.    abab

(h)       Why does the poet call the foreland ‘fairy foreland’?

Ans.    The poet calls the foreland ‘fairy foreland’ to bring out its beauty and the romance that it has about itself.

(i)         How does the brook behave when it has curves on its banks?

Ans.    The brook behaves `angrily’ when it faces curves on its banks. It is clear because the poet has used the word ‘fret’ to explain the brook’s feeling.

(j)         What is the figure of speech in the last two lines of the above stanza?

Ans.    The figure of speech used in ‘Alliteration” using the consonant sounds “f” and “w”. This creates a musical sound.

(k)        What type of fields are described in the above extract?

Ans.    The fields described in the above extract look like the lands of fairies. The fields are   fertile lands with beautiful landscapes. They are full of flowers, insects and butterflies. There are bushes of willow and plants of mallow.

(VI)

I chatter, chatter, as I flow

To join the brimming river,

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever.

(a)        ‘I chatter, chatter as I flow’. In what way does the brook chatter?

Ans.    The swift moving and noisy brook passes over many stones and pebbles thus making them rub and roll against each other. This produces a sound like chattering.

(b)       What is the brook’s final destination?

Ans.    A brimming river is the final destination of the brook. Its journey would end when it will become one with the overflowing river.

(c)        Why has the word ‘chatter’ been repeated?

Ans.    The word ‘chatter’ has been repeated to emphasise the loud noise created by the brook.

(d)       Why has the poet used the word ‘brimming’? What kind of a picture does it create?

Ans.     ‘Brimming’ refers to the overflowing river. It shows abundance of water in it which means that it would never dry and would flow eternally.

(e)       The last two lines of this stanza are repeated several times in the poem. Can you suggest why?

Ans.    These lines form the poem’s refrain. Their repetition brings the idea of the transitory nature of human life as compared to that of the eternal nature of brook.

 (f)       What are the important aspects of land which have been covered by the Brook?

Ans.    The important aspects of land covered by the Brook till now are the hilly range and the plains Philip’s farm, field and fallow as it goes on its journey.

(g) Explain the last two lines “men many come and men may go, But I go on forever”.

Ans. This constitutes a refrain. These strike the keynote of the poem—the brook’s eternity and man’s mortality.

(VII)

I wind about, and in and out,

With here a blossom sailing,

And here and there a lusty trout,

And here and there a grayling,

(a)        How does the brook move as described in the above stanza?

Ans.    The brook moves in a curved and winding manner. Its course bends and turns every now and then before it finally merges with a river.

(b)       In what way is the brook full of life?

Ans.    The brook is full of life in the sense that it is lively and sprightly in its movement. Secondly, it supports many forms of plant and animal life e.g. flowers and fish.

(c)        Which literary device is used in the last two lines of the stanza? What purpose does it serve in the poem?

Ans.    The poet has made use of repetition. The phrase ‘here and there’ occurs in the context of a blossom, a trout and a grayling to show that in the long course of the journey of the brook there are different forms of life that give it company as it flows on and on.

(d)       Describe the movement of the brook as mentioned in the given lines.

Ans.    The brook flows in a zig-zag way in this stage.

(e)        What does sail over the surface of the brook?

Ans.    A blossom sails over the surface of the brook.

(f)        What is the rhyme scheme used in the lines?

Ans.    The rhyme scheme used in the given lines is `ab, ab’.

(g)        Explain “I wind about and in and out”.

Ans.    The picture imagined here is of rivulet flowing in a zig-zag manner. Sometimes this enters underground and then it bubbles out into the open.

(h)       Name the different things that are carried by the brook?

Ans.    The different things that are carried by the brook are flowers that have fallen into it, fishes, foam and flakes.

(i)         Where does the brook carry all these things?

Ans.    The Brook carries all these things to the brimming river which it joins.

 (j)        Give the meaning of ‘trout’ and ‘grayling’.

Ans.    ‘Trout’ and ‘grayling’ are two types of fishes.

(k)        How does the brook’s movement “I wind about, and in and out” differ from its earlier movement?

Ans.    In the beginning the brook hurries downhill but gradually it gently meanders along.

(l)         What does the poet mean by the phrase ‘blossom sailing’.

Ans.    It means that the sailing has become slower, smoother and more pleasant.

(m)      Name the fishes that live in the river?

Ans.    The fishes that live in the river are trout and grayling.

 

(VIII)

And here and there a foamy flake

Upon me, as I travel

With many a silvery water break

Above the golden gravel,

(a)        How is a foamy flake formed in the brook?

Ans.    The swift and swirling water movement forms a rich foam of water in the brook. This cluster of bubbles floats on its surface and moves along with it.

(b)       Explain: ‘a silvery water break’.

Ans.    Many times obstructions interrupt the smooth flow of the brook and a water break is created. The sunrays fall on this break and make it shine like silver.

(c)        Besides the foamy flake, what else does the brook draw along as it travels?

Ans.    It draws many planes like flowers, animals like fish, stones and pebbles along with it as it travels.

(d)       What different colours have been mentioned in the stanza?

Ans.    There is indirect reference to the whiteness of the foam. The interruption in the flow of water give it a silver effect and its sandy bed has a golden colour.

 (e)      What is the poetic device used in `foamy flakes?’

Ans.    ‘Alliterationis the poetic device used in ‘foamy flakes’.

(f)        Where does the brook pass over?

Ans.    The brook passes over the golden shingles and pebbles.

(g)        What are formed above the golden gravels?

Ans.    Silvery waves and foamy flakes are formed above the golden gravels.

(h)       What occurs when the brook flows over “he golden gravel”?

Ans.    When the brook flows over “the golden gravel” there is a break in the flow of water which appears silvery.

(i)         What unique quality of the brook can be imagined in it carrying so many things to the brimming river?

Ans.   The unique quality of the brook that can be imagined is its parental nature, that is, the brook is the home of fishes, flowers that get carried by it which grows close to its banks.

(IX)

And draw them all along, and flow

To Join the brimming river

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on for ever.

 

(a)        What does ‘them’ in the first line refer to?

Ans.    ‘Them’ stands for small clusters of foam, blossoms of flower, fish, stones and pebbles that the brook carries along with it.

(b)       Give an example of alliteration in these lines.

Ans.    Men may come and men may go. ‘m’ sound has been repeated.

(c)        The last two lines sum up the main idea of the poem. Explain what the idea is.

Ans.    Human life is short and transitory but the brook, like Time, flows on and on forever and forever. For it, constant movement is life.

(d)       What effect does the repetition of ‘men’ produce in the stanza?

Ans.    Apart from conveying that innumerable men have been taking birth and dying, the repetition creates a musical effect.

(e)       What does the brook draw all along it?

Ans.    The brook pushes and carries along with it all the gravels or shingles.

(f)        What does the poet want to say in the third line?

Ans.    The poet wants to highlight the fact that man’s existence is transitory.

(g) What is the message in the last line of the stanza regarding the brook?

(c) The poet highlights the eternal onward flow of the brook.

(X)

I steal by lawns and grassy plots,

I slide by hazel covers

I move the sweet forget-me-nots

That grow for happy lovers.

(a) What does the word ‘steal’ suggest about the brook’s movement?

Ans.    It suggests silent and stealthy movement of water which the brook attains as it progresses through the level and plain areas.

(b)       What is the word ‘slide’ suggestive of?

Ans.    ‘Slide’ refers to not so swift but smooth flow of the brook. As it flows over the plains, it moves on gracefully and leisurely.

(c)        How was the movement of the brook earlier?

Earlier, it moved swiftly and noisily with’a great sense of urgency.

(d)       ‘I move the sweet forget-me-nots’. How are the. forget-me-nots moved?

Ans.    The forget-me-not flowers that are growing along the banks of the brook are moved by the gentle current of the brook.

(e)       Why have forget-me-nots been given the adjective ‘sweet’?

Ans.    ‘Sweet’ brings out the beauty and the fragrance of the flowers.

(f)        Where does the river steal by?

Ans.    The river flows silently and unnoticed through lawns and grassy plots.

(g)        What are `forget-me-nots’ here?

Ans.    They are a kind of flowers.

(h)       What is the movement of the brook in these lines?

Ans.    The brook flows quietly and leisurely now.

(i)         What does the poet want to convey by using the words “steal” and “slide”?

Ans.    The poet wants to convey the brook’s movements in the use of these words. It moves silently without being seen when it passes by lawns and grassy plots.

(j)         What places does the brook pass by?

Ans.    The brook passes by lawns, grassy plots, woods where hazel trees grow and past bushes bearing forget-me-nots.

(k)        Why does the poet say forget-me-nots grow for “happy lovers”?

Ans.    The poet says this because forget-me-nots are flowers that symbolize eternal love.

(XI)

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,

Among my skimming swallows;

I make the netted sunbeam dance

Against my sandy shallows.

(a)        What does the first line describe?

Ans.    It describes the various movements and moods of the brook. Its quiet and graceful flow through the shady and sunny regions has been depicted.

(b)       What literary device(s)does the first line contain? Give examples.

Ans.    The poet has made use of alliteration by repeating the ‘s’ and ‘g’ sounds e.g. slip…slide, gloom and glance. The line also contains repetition of ‘I’ and verb words. The repetition depicts the varied movements and activities of the brook.

(c)        The swallows touch the surface of brook to

Ans.    catch the fish for food.

(d)       The brook calls the swallows ‘my skimming swallows’ because OR

What do you mean by skimming swallows?

Ans.    flying along the current, the swallows are reflected in the brook’s waters.

(e)       Explain: ‘…. the netted sunbeam’.

Ans.    The sunlight seems to be trapped in the water like the fish. Its reflected rays produce a net-like effect of flashing light.

(f)        What is the poetic device used in the first line?

Ans.    ‘Alliteration’ is the poetic device used in the first line.

(g)        What does the brook make the netted sunbeams?

Ans.    The brook makes the netted sunbeams dance.

(h)       What do these lines show about the nature of the brook?

Ans.    These lines highlight the carefree nature of the brook.

(i)         Name the literary device used in this stanza.

Ans.    The literary device used here is Alliteration.

(j)         What do ‘slipping’, ‘sliding’, `glooming’ and ‘glancing’ reflect?

Ans.    These words reflect the various moods and movements of the brook.

(k)        Name the poetic device used in line 2?

Ans.    The poetic device used in Line 2 is alliteration.

(XII)

I murmur under moon and stars

In brambly wildernesses;

I linger by my shingly bars;

I loiter round my cresses;

(a)        What changes do you notice in the movement of the brook here?

Ans.    Here the brook moves in a slow and lingering movement. Its splashy noise has now changed into a gentle murmur.

(b)       Why do you think the brook is murmuring now?

Ans.    Coming down the hills as it flows through the plains, the brook slows down and its flowing water creates only a soft murmuring sound.

(c)        Explain: ‘…. shingly bars’.

Ans.    Towards the end of the brook’s journey, pebbles and sand deposited in bar-like wavy shapes. They shine in moonlight.

(d)       Which literary device has been used in the first line?

Ans.    The poet has used onomatopoeia to bring out the sound effect. The onomatopoeic word ‘murmur’ describes the gentle sound the brook produces.

(e)       What is ‘brambly wilderness?’

Ans.    It means thorny wastelands.

(f)        Where does the brook murmur?

Ans.    The brook flows in a soft low murmuring sound ‘under moon and stars

(g)        Where does the brook loiter round?

Ans.    The brook loiters round the leafy green plants like `cresses‘.

(h)       What does the word ‘linger’ indicate?

Ans.    The word ‘linger’ indicates a slow and leisurely movement.

(i)         When does ‘I’ murmur?

Ans.    ‘I’ murmurs while passing through brambly wilderness under the moons and stars.

(j)         What is the difference between “bicker” and “murmur”?

Ans.    Bicker expresses the loud noise created by the brook whereas murmur veldt’s to a soft, whispering sound.

(k)        Why do you think the brook is murmuring now?

Ans.    The brook is about to reach the river and as it passes through wilderness or bushes, its speed is not very fast so the sound created resembles a murmur.

(XIII)

And out again I curve and flow

To join the brimming river,

For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever.

(a)        Explain: ‘And out again I curve and flow’.

Ans.    Even as the brook’s movement is interrupted by the plants and shrubs, it makes a final dash to reach its destination i.e. the brimming river

(b)       Why does the brook describe the river as brimming?

Ans.    With constant ‘feeding’ from the brooks, the river overflows or swells with water. That is why the brook describes the river as brimming.

(c)        Explain the last two lines of the stanza.

Ans.    The brook keeps on flowing unceasingly, though generations of human being come and go to yield place to the next generation.

(d)       What parallel does the poet draw between the brook and human life?

Ans.    Both brook and life symbolise constant movement, change and. renewal. The brook seems to be going on and on but human life is short lived. Men are born and they die. New lives come into the world but the brook is immortal and it keeps on flowing unceasingly.

(e)       What do you mean by ‘brimming river’?

Ans.    ‘Brimming river’ means river full of water to the margin.

(f)        What do the last two lines indicate about ‘I’?

Ans.    The last two lines indicate the joyous mood of the brook. They also draw a contrast between the transience of human life and the permanence of nature.

(g)        Where does the brook meander “out” of?

Ans.    The brook meanders “out” of thorny bushes and lonely moors.

(h)       Where does the brook flow from?

Ans.    The brook flows down from the hilly areas where coot and herons are found.

(i)         What does the poet mean by brimming river?

Ans.    This means that the river is at the point of overflowing.

Very Short Important Answer Type Questions- The Brook, the River Poem

  1. How does the brook ‘sparkle’?

Answer- The brook shines as the sunlight gets reflected in its splashing water.

  1. ‘Bicker’ means, to quarrel. Why does the poet use this word here?

Answer- The brook makes loud noise as it falls down. It sounds like a quarrel.

  1. How many hills and bridges does the brook pass during its journey?

Answer- The brook passes through thirty hills and fifty bridges.

  1. Where does it finally meet the river?

Answer- The brook finally meets the river near Phillip’s farm.

  1. Why has the word ‘chatter’ been repeated in the poem?

Answer- The poem is written in the first person and since the brook is narrating its story, the word ‘chatter’ is used. It is to heighten the autobiographical element and make it look personal.

  1. ‘With many a curve my banks I fret.’ What does the poet mean by this statement?

Answer- The brook becomes tired occasionally as it has to curve and move round and round, again and again.

  1. ‘I wind about, and in and out’. What kind of picture does this line create in your mind?

Answer– A picture of a whirlpool.

  1. Name the different things that can be found floating in the brook.

Answer- Flowers, fish, willows, weeds etc.

  1. What does the poet want to convey by using the words ‘steal’ and ‘slide’?

Answer- It refers to smooth and noiseless movement of the brook.

  1. The poem has many examples of alliteration. List any five examples.

Answer- Babble-bubble, field-fallow, golden-gravel, slide-slip, gloom-glance etc.

  1. ‘I make the netted sunbeam dance.’ What does ‘netted sunbeam’ mean? How does it dance?

Answer- The sunrays filtering through the leaves and bushes make a net-like pattern on shallow water-pools. They are reflected on the surface of water and appear to be dancing as the water flows.

  1. What is the ‘refrain’ in the poem? What effect does it create?

Answer- The ‘refrain’ in the poem is ‘for men may come and men may go, But I go on forever.’ The repetition of the refrain emphasises the transitory nature of man and the eternal nature of the brook.

  1. Where does the brook begin?

Answer-Place frequented by coots and herns.

  1. Which is the last place to be visited by the brook?

Answer- Philip’s farm is the last place to be visited by the brook.

  1. When is the brook specially noisy?

Answer- When it flows over stones.

  1. What are the two things the brook is always doing?

Answer- Moving and making sounds are the two things the brook is always doing.

16.Name some things that float down all streams (Use your imagination).

Answer- Flowers, leaves, twigs, insects, fish.

  1. Why is the water described as silvery?

Answer- The sun shines on the water making it sparkle like white silver.

  1. Why is gravel said to be golden?

Answer- It is yellow and brown in colour.

  1. The poem is written by

Answer- Alfred Lord Tennyson .

  1. The poem is written in the style of a

Answer- personification

  1. “By many a field and fallow” is an example of

Answer- an alliteration

  1. The rhyming scheme of the poem is-

Answer- abab

  1. The message of the poem is that the life of a brook is

Answer- eternal

 

Short Answer Type Important Questions- The Brook (to be answered in about 40 words each)

  1. Describe the course of the brook.

Ans.    Originating from the region that is inhabited by the water birds like coots and herons, the brook flows through valleys, towns, fields and bridges. Next, it comes across wilderness that is over-grown with thorny bushes. Flowing with a single-mindedness of purpose, aiming to merge with the river, it finally reaches its ultimate destination and becomes one with the river.

 

  1. How can we say that life is a journey?

Ans.    Life is a journey in the sense that it is constant movement and progression in time and is a cycle of growth and decay. Birth is the beginning of a  journey and death its culmination. The journey of life is full of hurdles, roadblocks, surprises and unexpected dangers which are to be overcome.

 

  1. How is the journey of human life different from the journey of the brook? or

What is the special feature of the poem the brook?

Ans.    Although quite similar in many ways, the journey of a brook and the journey of human life are strikingly different. The brook’s journey is constant and eternal as compared to that of human life which is transitory and short-lived. The brook moves on incessantly whereas generations of men appear and disappear from the face of earth after a brief span of time.

 

  1. What is the significance of various places for the brook? Compare this with human life.

Ans.    Starting its journey from the haunts of the coot and hem the brook travels through hills, ridges, towns, villages and bridges. The various places visited by the brook describe various hurdles and difficulties that it has to overcome. Just like the journey of the brook, human life also passes through many ups and downs, highs and lows, yet, like the brook it must move on towards its destination.

 

  1. Give the central idea of the poem “The rook”.

Ans.    The poet has made a poignant comment on the transience of human life as compared to the continuity and eternity of existence. Just like the journey of the brook, human life also passes through many ups and downs, highs and lows. It has to overcome many hurdles, difficulties and struggles in its life. Yet, like the brook it must move on towards its culmination, its ultimate destination and that is the message the poem gives us.

 

  1. Why do you think the poet lets the brook describe its journey rather than describing it himself?                                                                                

Ans.    The poet has used poetic device of personification in the poem “The Brook”. Hence the brook gives an autobiographical account of its journey right from the beginning till it reaches its destination. The poet has very skillfully made the brook narrate its story and this firsthand account makes the entire narrative much more vivid and authentic than if it had come through the poet’s mouth.

 

  1. Why have the lines ‘For men may come and men may go, But I go on forever’ been repeated in the poem several times? What is the significance of these lines?

Ans.    The lines ‘For men may come and men may go, But I go on forever’ is the refrain of the poem. They bring out a contrast between the transience (brevity) of human life and permanence _ of nature. The repetition, apart from being a constant reminder of this vital difference between nature and mortal human beings also lends a musical effect to the poem which highlights the brook’s joyous mood.

 

  1. Bring out a contrast between brook’s behaviour in the beginning and towards the end of its journey.

Ans.    In the beginning, the brook is playful as it hurries down the hills and flows down ‘slipping and sliding’ noisily. Drawing with itself pebbles, blossoms, fish and everything that comes its way, it shines and sparkles in the sun. As it advances towards the end of the journey, it becomes more mature and sober. Now its movement becomes slow and graceful.

 

  1. ‘I chatter, chatter as I flow’. In what way does the brook chatter?

Ans.    The swift moving and noisy brook passes over many stones and pebbles thus making them rub and roll against each other. This produces a sound like the chattering of monkeys. Moreover, the sprightly brook seems to be ‘talking’, too.

 

  1. Give examples of alliteration and the beautiful images that form the texture of the poem The Brook: or

Describe the visual imaginary in the poem the brook?

Ans.    Sudden sally, bubble babble, twenty thorpe, field and fallow, I slip, I slide. willow-weed are’Alliteration. The poem forms many beautiful images—the first one is formed in stanza 2 By thirty  hills – a hundred  bridges’. This vivid image is of the brook flowing through hills and valleys, under bridges and passing by the villages. Another beautiful and strikingly vivid image created by the poet is that of the brook making serpent motions slipping, sliding, glancing among meadows, grassy plots, forget me-nots and floating fish.

 

  1. How is the journey of the brook similar to the Journey of life and yet different?

Ans.    There are various similarities between the brook and the journey of life, e.g., both have a beginning, a middle and an end. There are struggles in the lives of both—the human life continues in spite of struggles and ups and downs  and the brook continues to flow against all odds. But one thing is different—man is mortal, whereas the brook  is eternal, men may come and men may go but the brook goes on forever.

  1. ‘The Brook’ proceeds like a travelogue. Discuss the importance of the various places that the brook encounters on its journey.

Ans.    The brook travels through hills and vales, between ridges and under bridges, beside Philip’s farm, fallow land and foreland, making its way through, with a blossom here and a trout there and many a grayling through obstructions of sand and ravel until it falls into the big river. It passes thirty hills and fifty bridges. It chatters and babbles and creates music as it flows.

 

  1. Describe four movements that the brook makes during its journey.

Ans.    The various movements that the brook makes on its journey are best described by the poet Lord Tennyson through words like sally, sparkle, slide, move, slip, hurry, flow, go, loiter, linger. It sparkles as it emerges among the plants with slender leaves, it sparkles in sunshine among the ferns. It hurries down hills and slips between ridges. It steals by lawns and slides, by hazel covers, it slips and slides, it glooms and glides and glances. It means it moves gently, slowly, unobserved, smoothly and then comes out into the open.

 

  1. What is the symbolic meaning conveyed by “For men may come and men may go, but I go on forever’?

Ans.    The brook is a small stream that is born in some mountain. It grows bigger and stronger in the course of its journey. It makes many types of sounds as it flows through the pebbles. Its movements are also varied. It slips and slides; it steals and winds its curves and flows. It chatters and babbles, it makes musical as well as harsh sounds. The brook’s birth and growth, chattering and babbling are very much similar to the activities of a human being. The brook’s represents life in general. Both have an origin, a middle stage and an end. Both struggle against various adversities , odds and keep moving towards their goal. Above all, the brook represents life. Men may come and men may go, but life goes on forever. The same rule applies in the case of the brook. It keeps flowing eternally, like life.

 

  1. What does the poet want to convey through the poem, ‘The Brook’?

Ans.     The brook is a symbol of the struggle of human life. The poet wishes to point out that just as ups and down do not deter the brook from its journey, similarly, human beings should also take the hurdles and sorrows in their stride.

 

  1. Name the different things that can be found floating in the brook.

Ans.  The brook passes through many hills, ridges, gardens and valleys. It proceeds on its journey with great force So it carries many flowers, ferns, pebbles, weeds with its flow. Many times colourful fish like the trout or the grayling can be seen floating in it. When the current is strong, foam gathers on its surface. The brook embraces everything it encounters with great   happiness.

  1. 17. What is the message given by the brook?

Ans.    The poet wants to convey the message by personifying the brook that just as the brook overcomes many hurdles and obstacles in its journey bravely and reaches its final destination in the same way human  beings, should also remain undeterred to accept the joys and sorrows of life and face all the obstacles, that come in way of their aim  bravely.

 

  1. How is the journey of the brook similar to human life?

Ans.    The journey of a brook is similar to human life. Like brook, human beings also move forward in life, overcoming all the obstacles and difficulties. They never give up and adjust and accommodate themselves to the various hardships of life. Different phases of their life reflect different moods, tones and temperaments. As time passes, both become mature and sober.

 

  1. What are the different companions of brook?

Ans.    The brook carries all that comes its way. From blossoms to fishes like lusty trouts and graylings, the sand, pebbles, small stones and all that comes floating by is carried by the brook.

 

  1. Why have the lines Tor men may come and men may go, But I go on forever’ been repeated in the poem several times? What is the significance of these lines?

Ans.     These lines have been repeated several times in the poem to heighten the poetic effect and to highlight the main theme of the poem. These lines have been used by Tennyson to bring the contrast between the transitory existence of man and the eternal existence of the brook. It also lends a musical effect to the poem which highlights the brook’s joyous mood.

 

  1. “Tennyson not only describes the beautiful journey of the brook but also comments on the transitory nature of human life.” Comment.

Ans.    The refrain in the poem highlights the difference or contrast between the transitory existence of men and permanent and eternal existence of the brook. “For men may come and men may go, but I go on forever”. Men’s existence on this earth is not permanent. They take birth, live their lives and die. Death ends the story of their lives. However, the existence of the brook is not transitory like men. It will go on flowing for eternity.

 

  1. Describe the sound and music created by the brook during its journey.

Ans.    The brook creates its own music and sound while it is flowing onwards to meet the brimming river. The most common sound used by Tennyson is the ‘chattering’ sound of the brook. It ‘chatters’ over stony ways. It ‘chatters’ and chatters’ as it flows. It creates ‘sharpes and ‘trebles’ creating high sounding sharp sounds. The brook ‘babble’ over the pebbles. When in an angry mood, the river ‘frets against its bank to show its aggressiveness. Under the moon and stars, the same brook seems to murmur softly in wilderness.

  1. The poet has used a number of words that indicate the movement of the brook. Describe the brook in different movements during its onward journey.

Ans.    Lord Tennyson captures the various moods and movements of the brook. He has used words like ‘sally’, ‘slide’, ‘travel’, ‘hurry’, ‘slip’, ‘flow’, ‘move’, ‘steal’ and ‘wind’ to describe the various movements of the brook. In its infancy, the words used are: ‘hurry’, and ‘slide’. On the other hand, when the brook flows into open. the words used are ‘steal’ and ‘slip’ to show its leisurely pace.

 

  1. Describe the different places that the brook passes through before it joins the brimming river.

Ans.    The onward journey of the brook is quite fascinating. After originating from the place of its birth, it hurries down thirty hills. Then it slips between the narrow ridges. Then it comes into open. It passes through twenty villages, a little town and half a hundred villages. Now it prepares itself to join the brimming river at Philip’s farm.

 

  1. Describe the origin of the brook.

Ans.    The brook or the small river originates from a place which is haunted by water-birds like coots and herons. The brook emerges from its origin suddenly and flows down noisily towards a valley. Here the brook makes a lot of deafening noise. Its pace and movement is sudden and exceptionally fast.

 

26       Describe the different places that the brook passes through before it joins the brimming river.

Ans.    The onward journey of the brook is quite fascinating. After originating from the place of its birth, it hurries down thirty hills. Then it slips between the narrow ridges. Then it comes into open. It passes through twenty villages, a little town and half a hundred villages. Now it prepares itself to join the brimming river at Philip’s farm.

 

  1. The poet has used a number of words that indicate the movement of the brook. Describe the brook in different movements during its onward journey.

Ans.    Lord Tennyson captures the various moods and movements of the brook He has used words like ‘sally’, ‘slide’, ‘travel’, ‘hurry’, `slip’, ‘flow’, ‘move’, ‘steal’ and `wind’ to describe various movements of the brook. In its infancy the words used are: ‘hurry’, ‘sally’ and ‘slide’. On the other hand, when the brook flows into open, the words used are ‘steal’ and ‘slip’ to show its leisurely pace and movement.

 

  1. Describe the sounds and music created by the brook during its journey.

Ans.    The brook creates its own music and sound while it is flowing onward to meet the brimming river. The most common sound used by Tennyson is the ‘chattering’ sound of the brook. It ‘chatters’ over stony ways. It ‘chatters and chatters’ as it flows. It creates ‘sharps and trebles’ creating high sounding sharp sounds. The brook ‘babbles’ over the pebbles. When in a gry mood the river ‘frets’ against its bank to show its aggressiveness. Under the moon and stars, the same brook seems to murmur softly in wilderness.

 

  1. Give examples to prove that the brook is a source of life.

Ans.    The brook is a source of life. It has its own support system. All kinds of weeds, blossoms, plants, grassy lawns and plots and trees grow on its banks or watery surfaces. Then it is an important source of food and water for animals and men. Lusty trouts and graylings provide food to animals and human beings.

 

  1. Is there any parallel between the journey of the brook and human life? Prove your point by giving examples from the poem.

Ans.    Certainly, there is a parallel between the journey of the brook and life of man. Like man, the brook has its period of infancy. It emerges suddenly from the place of its birth and hurries down thirty hills and slides between the ridges. It has its period of youth. Like a young man, the brook does have a support system. It provides flowers, weeds, trees, bushes, grassy lawns, lusty trouts and graylings to support a life system. Like an old man, the river becomes relaxed and it ‘steals’ and ‘slips’ unnoticed by grassy plots and hazel covers before falling into the brimming river.

 

  1. Draw a contrast between the transitory existence of men and eternal and permanent existence of the brook.

Ans.    The refrain in the poem highlights this difference or contrast between the two. Tor Men may come and men may go/But I go on forever’. Men’s existence on this earth is not permanent. They take birth, live their lives and die. Death ends the story of their lives. However, the existence of the brook is not transitory like men. It will go on flowing for ever.

 

  1. The poet has repeated certain lines in the poem. What is this repetition called? Why is it used in this poem?

Ans.    This repetition is called a refrain. it adds music and brings out the poet’s philosophy—the contrast between man’s mortality and the eternal nature of the brook .

 

  1. How does the brook babble? Why has the narrator used this word?

Ans.    When the brook passes over pebbles and stones, it makes a lot of noise. It seems as if it were babbling or talking gaily.

 

  1. Why has the sound created by the brook called “chatter”?

Ans.    As the brook passes over small and large stones, it makes a series of high-pitched sounds like monkeys do. Hence it has been called chatter.

 

  1. When does the sound of the brook resemble a “murmur”?

Ans.    When the brook reaches the end of its journey the speed slows down considerably and the sound resembles a “murmur”.

 

  1. What do “skimming swallows” refer to?

Ans.    “Skimming swallows” refer to the swallows which are a kind of bird that “skim” or lightly touch the surface of the brook as they fly very close to the surface of the brook.

 

  1. How does the poet use the brook to draw a parallel with the life of a man?

Ans.    This is a poem that traces the life of a brook or a small stream as it emerges from the mountaintop and flows down the hills and across valleys to empty into the river. on a deeper level, the poet .. uses the brook to draw a parallel with the life of a man. Like the brook, man is energetic, lively and moves swiftly when he is young but slows down later on in life just like the brook does before it reaches the river.

 

  1. Describe the various things a brook travels past to join the river.

Ans.    The brook emerges from the mountaintop where coots and herons live and flows down the hills and across valleys to empty into the river. It bubbles with energy as it flows down the hill side making a lot of noise. As it passes through different landforms, like forests, fields that are either fertile or fallow, grassy lawns and flower- filled gardens with forget-me-nots and hazel trees, it slows down considerably. It does not follow a straight path but meanders on around rocks and boulders without letting anything stop its path. Thus it continues to flow from its source to the river eternally.

 

  1. Explain the lines “For men may come and men may go but I go on for ever.”

Ans.    These lines highlight the eternal nature of the brook which continues to flow year after year from its source to the river without fail. it expresses the fact that though men die and others are born, the brook is immortal. Therefore these lines highlight the short-lived quality of human life as compared to nature

 

  1. In the poem, the brook is the narrator and the brook describes its own journey. Do you think the poet has a reason for this? Give your own answers.

Ans.    Encourage the students to think creatively and formulate their own answers. The poet uses a poetic device known as personification. The brook narrates the story like a person and as such we are able to relate to its journey. He uses this poetic device to draw a parallel between people and nature. I think the poet made the brook the narrator to being in a different perspective as well as see life and its different stages from a whole different point of view.

 

 

  1. How is the journey of the brook similar to the journey of life and yet different?

Ans. There are various similarities between the brook and the journey of life, e.g., both have a beginning, a middle age and an end. There are struggles in the lives of both — the human life continues in spite of struggles and ups and downs and the brook continues to flow against all odds. But one thing is different — man is mortal, whereas the brook is eternal, man may come and man may go but the brook goes on forever.

 

  1. ‘The Brook’ proceeds like a travelogue. Discuss the importance of the various places that the brook encounters on its journey.

Ans. The brook travels through hills and vales, between ridges and under bridges, beside Philip’s farm, fallow land and foreland, making its way through, with a blossom here and a trout there and many a grayling through obstructions of sand and gravel until it falls into the big river. It passes thirty hills and fifty bridges. It chatters and babbles and creates music as it flows.

 

  1. Describe four movements that the brook makes during its journey.

Ans.- The various movements that the brook makes on its journey are best described by the poet Lord Tennyson through words like sally, sparkle, slide, move, slip, hurry, flow, go, loiter, linger. It sparkles as it emerges among the plants with slender leaves, it sparkles in sunshine among the ferns. It hurries down hills and slips between ridges. It steals by lawns and slides, by hazel covers, it slips and slides, it glooms and glides and glances. It means it moves gently, slowly, unobserved, smoothly and then comes out into the open.

 

  1. What is the symbolic meaning conveyed by “For men may come and men may go, but I go on forever”?

Ans.- The brook is a small stream that is born in some mountain. It grows bigger and stronger in the course of its journey. It makes many types of sounds as it flows through the pebbles. Its movements are also varied. It slips and slides; it steals and winds its curves and flows. It chatters and babbles, it makes musical as well as harsh sounds. The brook’s birth and growth, chattering and babbling are very much similar to the activities of a human being. The brook represents life in general. Both have an origin, a middle stage and an end. Both struggle against various adversities, odds and keep moving towards their goal. Above all, the brook represents life. Men may come and men may go, but life goes on forever. The same rule applies in the case of the brook. It keeps flowing eternally, like life.

 

  1. What does the poet want to convey through the poem, ‘The Brook’ ?

Ans.- The brook is a symbol of the struggle of human life. The poet wishes to point out that just as ups and down do not deter the brook from its journey, similarly, human beings should also take the hurdles and sorrows in their stride.

 

  1. Name the different things that can be found floating in the brook.

Ans.- The brook passes through many hills, ridges, gardens and valleys. It proceeds on its journey with great force. So it carries many flowers, ferns, pebbles, weeds with its flow. Many times colourful fish like the trout or the grayling can be seen floating in it. When the current is strong, foam gathers on its surface. The brook embraces everything it encounters with great happiness.

 

  1. What is the message given by the brook?

What are the objectives of the poem the brook?

Ans.- The poet wants to convey the message by personifying the brook that just as the brook overcomes many hurdles and obstacles in its journey bravely and reaches its final destination in the same way human beings should also remain undeterred to accept the joys and sorrows of life and face all the obstacles, that come in way of their aim, bravely.

 

Important Long/ Detailed Answer Type Questions- to be answered in about 100 -150 words each

 

  1. Same values govern the lives of the Brook and human beings except the length of their lives. Do you agree? Give textual evidence in support your answer.

Answer- There are many things common in the lives of human beings and the Brook. Both have more or less similar milestones or stages of life – childhood, youth, middle age and extreme old age. Both of them laugh and cry, like beauty, enjoy music and dance. Both are in harmony with nature and experience similar feelings and emotions. Both bring hope, joy and sustenance to others. An inner urge to move on and on and explore and discover life is shared by both, and both experience many ups and downs during their journey of life. Different phases of their lives reflect different moods, tones and temperaments. As time passes, both become mature and sober. However, there is one very peculiar difference between the two, Man dies after the course of his life comes to an end, but the keeps moving on perpetually.

  1. The brook is unstoppable in its journey in spite of many hurdles. What different hurdles does it come across in the course of its journey? What values or lessons can we learn from this quality of the brook? Or

How does brook teach the value of generosity?

Ans. The brook’s journey is never-ending but tedious. Right from its origin to its merging with the brimming river, it comes across many obstacles. As it commences its journey from the habitat of the ‘coot and hem’ it flows through the fern noisily into a valley. It comes across many hills but nothing stops it – it keeps on advancing through many towns and villages. Numerous bridges adorn the course of its journey. Stones and pebbles cause obstructions but it flows over these hurdles without coming to a standstill. Following its meandering course, it carries with itself whatever it finds in its water and on its surface. Sand deposits make it shallow at places. The brook flows in the loneliness of the night through the wasteland overgrown with thorny bushes. However, nothing succeeds in stopping it and it flows on with a single track mind to merge with the river.   The all-important value or lesson we can learn from this quality of the Brook is to keep moving on in our life with a dogged determination, in spite of all obstacles and hurdles. It teaches us to take hardships and difficulties, ups and downs, highs and lows in our stride. We must not wallow in self-pity but remain forever cheerful. Finally, it also gives us a grim reminder that a life that begins must come to an end sooner or later. So we must live it to the fullest.

  1. “For men may come and men may go,

But I go on forever.”

On the basis of your understanding of this comment of the Brook, analyze the following:

– the transience of human life

– the need to live life to the fullest

In your opinion what matters more – length of life in years or the quality of life people live? Give reasons in support of your view.

Ans. As compared to the life of a brook, human life is really transient. Generations of men appear on and disappear from the face of the earth within a brief span of time. When we see someone living a lot longer than we normally do, we feel sad that we have a short  life to live. It seems to end too soon. For ages we have been trying  ways to prolong our life, for we don’t like the idea of dying.  Death means sorrow and pain; being alive is such a joy.  Since our life is much too short and we get to live only once, it is  really very important that we live our life gracefully and

meaningfully and live it to the maximum. We must make the best  of every moment we get to live, enjoying the pleasures that it  affords and bringing joy to others in our life. That is what makes  life so very interesting, so very meaningful. Otherwise, it is empty and meaningless.

I strongly believe what matters more in life is not the length in terms of years but the quality of life. People like Keats and Shelley died young, but what a treasure house of poetry they

have left behind. On the other hand, there are those who burden the earth for decades and are not able to enjoy life. All the while they keep complaining, moaning and groaning. Then there are others who have created strife, hatred and bloodshed. The longer they live, the more evil they unleash. So the measure of life well-lived should be noble and good deeds, not years.

  1. “Tennyson’s poem offers a visual treat of sight and sound.” Discuss by giving examples from the poem ‘The Brook’.

Ans. lord Tennyson provides us a visual treat of sight and sound using words like—bicker, murmur, chatter, babble and trebles for sound. Murmur means making soft sounds, bicker means to flow with a loud noise, treble is a high pitched sound in music. Chatter means making meaningless sound, so the brook chatters in little sharps and trebles, it babbles on the pebbles thus giving us a treat of sound. The visual treats are conveyed by—I make a sudden sally and sparkle among the fern, I steal by lawns.  I slide by hazel covers. I move the sweet forget-me-nots. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance—sometimes it moves gently, sometimes forcefully. ‘It moves in and out mean it makes a zigzag movement like a snake.

  1. The journey of the brook is narrated by the brook itself. Discuss the effectiveness of the first person narration, used by Lord Tennyson?

Ans. The brook is an inanimate object but the poet by introducing the device of personification makes it tell its I. – experiences as it flows down hills, valley, villages and fields and finally joins a river. The brook relates the tale of its  journey in detail and with accuracy. Its movements and the sounds it makes as it moves over pebbles, stony paths, as it  cuts its own banks and lets the beams of sun dance on its waters, how it carries flowers and fish along with it to the big : river. There is vividness, liveliness and an effectively painted picture of a brook taking its natural course which comes alive before our eyes.

  1. Describe the journey of the Brook, originating from the ‘haunts of coot and heron’, joining the river, as its final destination.

Ans. The brook travels through various places. It starts its journey somewhere in the mountains, which are home to birds like coot and heron. It emerges suddenly from a plateau and falls down into a valley. On its way, it passes through various hills, ridges, villages and lawns. It makes various kinds of movements like swirl, spiral, sally, bicker.he etc. Sometimes it makes curved whistling movements, moving over pebbles, flowers, fish. It attains progress over the Plain area. Hordes of birds skim over the surface of water to catch fish. The brook looks beautiful as the starlight seems to be trapped on its surface, producing a net-like effect. Before reaching its final destination, the brook takes on a slow Ind lingering movement. In the end, it makes a final dash to meet the brimming river.

which is eternal.

  1. Write the autobiography of the brook before it meets the river.

Following answer is the Autobiography of the brook

Answer-

  • Make a sudden appearance by emerging from the mountains, the dwelling place of water birds (coot and hem). Sparkle and shine among the fern (flowerless plants) because the sun’s rays are reflected off by it.
  • Flow down valley quickly in a very noisy manner.
  • Flow by stony ways, create a whirlpool (eddying bay) and chatter because of the stones and pebbles in its path.
  • As I flow further, erode banks. flow by fields, infertile barren lands and a foreland filled with flowers (willow-weed and mallow).
  • Then meander in and out, and carry blossoms, silt, fish (grayling and trout) and gravel
  • Some changes in the terrain; my water hits many hard objects, causing the water to split in various directions and foam formation.
  • As I come closer towards the river, in the plains, movement becomes slower, gentle, calm, quiet and soft.
  • Flow smoothly by the lawns and grassy plots; and the hazel covers and the forget- me-nots flowers.
  • The sunlight falls on my water; water becomes shallower.
  • At night flow through thorny forests; by eroded pebbles and stones slowly and by tresses.
  • join the brimming river.
  1. The brook appears to be a symbol of life. Pick out examples of a parallel drawn between life and the brook.

Answer- The brook is a small stream that is born in some mountain. It grows bigger and stronger in the course of its journey. It makes so many types of sounds as it flows through the pebbles. Its movements are also varied. It slips and slides; it steals and winds its curves and flows. It chatters and babbles, it makes musical as well as harsh sounds. The brook’s birth and growth, chattering and babbling are very much similar to the activities of a human being. The brook represents life in general. Both have an origin, a middle stage and an end. Both struggle against various adversities, odds and keep moving towards their goal. Above all, the brook represents life. Men may come and men may go, but life goes on forever. The same rule applies in the case of the brook. It keeps flowing eternally, like life.

 

  1. “Tennyson’s poem offers a visual treat of sight and sound.” Discuss by giving examples from the poem ‘The Brook’.

Ans. Lord Tennyson provides us a visual treat of sight and sound using words like—bicker, murmur, chatter, babble and trebles for sound. Murmur means making soft sounds, bicker means to flow with a loud noise, treble is a high pitched sound in music. Chatter means making meaningless sound, so the brook chatters in little sharps and trebles, it babbles on the pebbles thus giving us a treat of sound. The visual treats are conveyed by — I make a sudden sally and sparkle among the fern, I steal by lawns. I slide by hazel covers. I move the sweet forget-me-nots. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance — sometimes it moves gently, sometimes forcefully. ‘It moves in and out’ mean it makes a zigzag movement like a snake.

 

  1. The journey of the brook is narrated by the brook itself. Discuss the effectiveness of the first person narration, used by Lord Tennyson.

Ans. The brook is an inanimate object but the poet by introducing the device of personification makes it tell its experiences as it flows down hills, valley, villages and fields and finally joins a river. The brook relates the tale of its journey in detail and with accuracy. Its movements and the sounds it makes as it moves over pebbles, stony paths, as it cuts its own banks and lets the beams of sun dance on its waters, how it carries flowers and fish along with it to the big river. There is vividness, liveliness and an effectively painted picture of a brook taking its natural course which comes alive before our eyes.

 

  1. What is the moral message in the poem ‘The Brook’?

OR

How is the brook a symbol of human life?

Ans. The poem ‘The Brook’ not only describes the journey of the brook but it also parallels the journey of human life. The poet wishes to highlight one important difference, that human life is transitory and comes to an end with death but the brook is immortal, its journey continues non-stop. The brook passes through many ups and downs like the highs and lows of human life. The brook passes through various places, which affects its smooth flow. Similarly human beings also encounter different problems, which affect their personality in turn. Just as the brook meets many kinds of life, like trout and grayling, similarly human beings interact with different people in the journey of life. They help and support them, just like the brook sustains many flowers, plants and sea-life. The brook imparts its zest and verve like human beings. Somewhere it is noisy, somewhere it is calm, like the peace and aggression depicted by the human beings. So the brook is a symbol of struggle of life, of meeting different odds, to remain undeterred in facing challenges, without any fear and still continues in one’s pursuit. The brook provides a valuable lesson to remain unshaken in one’s goal to accept joys and sorrows in one’s stride and still remain steadfast. So the brook and life symbolize constant movement, change, dynamism and renewal.

 

  1. Describe the journey of the Brook, originating from the ‘haunts of coot and heron’, joining the river, as its final destination.

Ans. The brook travels through various places. It starts its journey somewhere in the mountains, which are home to birds like coot and heron. It emerges suddenly from a plateau and falls down into a valley. On its way, it passes through various hills, ridges, villages and lawns. It makes various kinds of movements like swirl, spiral, sally, bicker etc. Sometimes it makes curved whistling movements, moving over pebbles, flowers, fish. It attains progress over the plain area. Hordes of birds skim over the surface   water to catch fish. The brook looks beautiful as the starlight seems to be trapped on its surface, producing a net-like effect. Before reaching its final destination, the brook takes on a slow and movement. In the end, it makes a final dash to meet the brimming river.

 

  1. What is the moral message in the poem ‘The Brook’?

Or

How is the brook a symbol of human life?

Ans. The poem ‘The Brook’ not only describes the journey of the brook but it also parallels the journey of human life. The poet wishes to highlight one important difference, that human life is transitory and comes to an end with death but the brook is immortal, its journey continues non-stop. The brook passes through many ups and downs like the highs and lows of human life. The brook passes through various places, which affects its smooth flow. Similarly human beings also encounter different problems, which affect their personality in turn. Just as the brook meets many kinds of life, like trout and grayling, similarly human beings inters (‘ with different people in the journey of life. They help and support them, just like the brook sustains many flowers, plants and sea-life. The brook imparts its zest and verve like human beings. Somewhere it is noisy; somewhere it is calm, like the peace and aggression depicted by the human beings. So the brook is a symbol of struggle of life, of meeting different odds, to remain undeterred in facing challenges, without any fear and still continues in one’s pursuit. The brook provides a valuable lesson to remain unshaken in one’s goal to accept joys and sorrows in one’s stride and still remain steadfast. So the brook and life symbolise constant movement, change dynamism and renewal.

Value Based Questions

Value Based Questions – The Brook

  1. The brook appears to be a source and symbol of life. Pick out examples of Parallelism between life and the brook highlighting the contrast between the transitory existence of of man and the eternal existence of the brook? OR

How is the brook a source of life illustrate with examples?

Answer- Parallel with Human Life :

  • When the brook emerges from the mountains, its movement is very noisy and quick and it is very energetic. It is in a rush to achieve its goal of joining the overflowing river. Similarly, man in his youth is very lively, agile, energetic and active.
  • The brook in its early stages is very fast and overcomes all the hurdles, hard objects, stones and pebbles in its journey. This can be compared to man in his youth who is enthusiastic and can strive and accept all the challenges that come in his way.
  • During the journey, the brook takes along with it silt, gravel, blossoms and fish. Similarly man also takes away different people he comes across along with him, in some way, to accompany him ahead in the journey of life.
  • When the brook comes closer to the river, its movement becomes slow and smooth, which can be compared to man in his old age, who becomes very calm, gentle, soft and lethargic.
  • The difference between the two is that the brook is eternal and keeps flowing on forever, while man reaches his final destination after his old age by meeting the horns of death.
  1. The brook is a symbol of energy and determination to us. Describe in about 100 words.

Answer- The poem draws a parallel between the journey of the brook and the journey of the human life. Tennyson personifies the brook to make it a metaphor or symbol of life and living. The use of the first person ‘I’ is quite significant. The origin and the onward flow of the brook runs parallel to the onward journey of man in life. The brook is rightly compared to human life. Like the life of man, it also passes through various stages of development. As it flows on, it changes its size, sound and movements. In its infancy, it hurries down thirty hills and slips through ridges. When it is young, like human beings, it frets, rushes and gushes with all dynamism and roaring noise. Like human beings, the brook also becomes mature and middle-aged. Here it loses its turbulence when it flows in the open. Here it ‘steals’ by the lawns and grassy plots and ‘slides’ by hazel covers. It flows silently before it joins the brimming river. The brook also has a life-support system of its own. Many herbs, bushes, plants, willows, lawns, flowers grow near its banks. Moreover, it carries lusty trouts and graylings providing food for animals and men.

Similar to the journey of the brook, human life also passes through many ups and downs. It has to overcome many hurdles, difficulties and struggles in its life. But, just as brook goes on undaunted and heads towards its destination, human beings must also go on.

  1. Why do you think the poet lets the brook describe its journey?

Answer- The poet has used poetic device of personification in the poem ‘The Brook’. In the form of an autobiography, it describes its journey right from the beginning till it reaches its journey. The brook skillfully narrates its story and this first-hand account makes the entire narrative much more vivid and authentic.

4- ‘The brook appears to be a source and symbol of life.’ What values do you learn from it?

Answer- The brook is a source of life. It has its own support system. All kinds of weeds, blossoms, plants, grassy lawns and plots and trees grow on its banks on watery surfaces. Then it is an important source of food and water for animals and men. Lusty trouts and graylings provide food to animals and human beings. Many herbs, bushes, plants, willows, lawns, flowers grow near its banks. While the brook is flowing into eternity, the existence of men is transitory. They take birth, live their lives and die but the brook is a never ending process. Brook selflessly serves all the creatures on earth. Man should also take inspiration from brook and serve humanity selflessly like brook. Man should overcome all the hurdles and difficulties in the journey of life. Like brook, we must move on towards our ultimate destination. We should be as useful and fruitful to others as the life of the brook is. Human beings must learn to take joys and sorrows in their stride and keep moving ever onwards.

  1. How can we say that life is a journey? Explain with reference to the poem The Brook’.

Ans.     Life is a journey in the sense that it is constant in movement and progressive in time and is a cycle of growth and decay. Birth is the beginning of a journey and death its culmination. The journey of life is full of hurdles, road blocks, surprises and unexpected dangers which are to be overcome. The initial phase of journey of life is full of excitement and joy. In the face of many ups and downs, the journey continues incessantly. Different phases of life reflect different moods, tones and temperaments. As time passes, one becomes mature and sober. The quest for culmination of life continues. It ends when we reach our destination that is death. One should undertake the journey of life cheerfully.

  1. The complete journey of the brook before it joins the ‘brimming river’ represents the journey of life. Elucidate.

Or

‘The Brook’ is in the form of autobiography where the brook relates its experiences as it flows towards the river. Justify the statement.

 

Answer- ‘The Brook’ describes the journey of a stream from its place of origin to the `brimming river’ it joins. The poem has been written in the form of an autobiography using the first person ‘I’ for the brook. The brook itself relates its experiences as it flows onward to meet the river. Actually, the brook has been personified in the poem. The brook originates from a place which is frequented by waterbirds like ‘coots and hems’. It emerges suddenly and flows down with a lot of noise. Then it hurries down by thirty hills and slips between the ridges. During its onward journey it passes through twenty hamlets or villages and a little town. It flows down under half a hundred villages. The brook joins the brimming river by Philip’s farm.

Tennyson follows the course or the movement of the brook at its every stage. The course or the movement of the brook represents the journey of life. When the brook is in its infancy, the movement is very brisk. It makes a `sudden sally’ and hurries down the hills. When it comes in open, it flows with leisurely and relaxed pace. It attains maturity. It steals by lawns and grassy plots and slides by hazel trees. Tennyson has created a great musical effect by utilising all sounds and noises of the brook. The brook ‘chatters’ over stony ways. It produces `sharps and trebles’ during its flow. It ‘babbles on the pebbles’. It slips. It ‘slides’ and it ‘murmurs under moon and stars’.

  1. The brook appears to be a source and symbol for life. Pick out examples of parallelism between life and the brook highlighting the contrast between tt: transitory existence of man and the eternal existence of the brook.

Answer- Tennyson personifies the brook to make it a metaphor or symbol of life and living. The use of the first person I’ is quite significant. The origin and the onward flow of the brook runs parallel to the onward journey of man in life. The brook is rightly compared to human life. Like the life of man it also passes through various stages of development. As it flows on, it changes its size, sounds and movements. In its infancy it hurries down thirty hills and slips through ridges. When it is young, like human beings, it frets, rushes and gushes with all dynamism and roaring noise. Like human beings, the brook also becomes mature and middle aged. Here it loses its turbulence. It flows into the open. It `steals by lawns and grassy plots’ and ‘slides by hazel covers’. It flows silently before it joins the brimming river. The brook has a life support system of its own. Many herbs, bushes, plants, willows, lawns, flowers grow near its banks. Moreover, it carries lusty trouts and gaylings providing food for animals and men. However, the refrain brings out the contrast between the existence of men and the existence of the brook. While the brook is flowing into eternity, the existence of men is transitory. They take birth, live their lives and die but the brook is a never ending process.

  1. Tennyson’s ‘The Brook’ is a poem of music and movement in words. Describe the musical quality of the poem with special reference to onomatopoeic words and ‘the refrain’ used in the poem.

Ans.     Tennyson had a special ear for musical qualities and it is best reflected in his poem `The Brook’. The poem is one of the finest examples of Tennyson’s weaving of music and movement in words. The brook emerges out suddenly `bickering’ or flowing down with a lot of noise. The brook ‘chatters’ over stony ways in ‘sharps and trebles’. Here, the poet uses high-pitched or high sounding words to show its sounds and noises during its onward flow. The brook ‘babbles’ on the ‘pebbles’. It `chatters’, ‘chatters’ as it flows to join the brimming river. Under the moon and stars the river `murmurs’ in a soft and gentle voice. Tennyson uses words whose sound seems to resemble the sound it denotes creating onomatopoeia. The onomatopoeic words used in the poem are `chatter’, ‘murmur’, `babbles on pebbles’. The poet captures the `movements’ of the brook in all its details. It makes a `sudden sally’ at its origin. It hurries down by thirty hills and `slips by the ridges’. The brook `winds about in and out’. In the open it ‘steals by lawns and grassy plots’ and ‘slides by hazel covers’. The refrain `For men may come and men may go,/But I go on forever’, adds to the musical quality of the poem and contrasts the transitory existence of men with the constant flowing of the brook into eternity.

 

 

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