Ch-2.1 WIND- Extra Questions and Notes

By | April 10, 2018

Extra Questions, Notes, Assignment and study material for Class 9th as Per CBSE Syllabus

Chapter- 2.1  English Language and Literature

Lesson Name- WIND

                                                       By- Subramanian Bharati

 

Introduction of the lesson- WIND

 

In this poem, the poet describes the action of the wind It breaks the shutters of the windows, throws down the books on the shelf and demolishes frail houses. But it has no effect on strong houses. It blows out weak fires. But it makes strong fires roar. The poet conveys the idea that nobody cares for the weak. The poet advises the weak ones to make themselves strong.

( इस कविता में ,कवि हवा के काम का वर्णन करता है । यह खिड़कियों के शीशे तोड़ देती है,  शेल्फ पर से पुस्तकें नीचे फैंक देती है और कमजोर मकानों को गिरा देती है । मगर इनका मजबूत मकानों पर कोई प्रभाव नहीं होता । यह कमजोर आग को बुझा देती है ।  मगर यह तेज आग को और प्रचंड बना देती है । कवि   यह विचार व्यक्त करता है कि कमजोर लोगों की कोई परवाह नहीं करता । कवि कमजोर लोगों को सलाह देता है कि वे स्वयं को मजबूत बनाएं । )

Introduction:(2)

The poem “Wind” describes the power of the wind on nature and human life. It focuses on the violent aspect of wind that causes destruction. The fierce wind is also seen by the poet as a symbol of adversities in life. It ends with a suggestion that if we remain strong, we can overcome any obstacles. Written originally in Tamil by Subramania Bharati and translated by A. K. Ramanujan, this poem is an example of modem poetry written in free verse with unequal and unrhyming lines.

THEME

 The poem depicts the utterly enormous power of wind in the world and how it has the potential of being both a destroyer and a creator. The weak and fragile cannot withstand its fury, while the strong can use it to their advantage. The same is true of the adversities of life -those who are weak easily break down and those who are strong take them in their stride and come out stronger. Therefore, our attitude to life and its trials and tribulations determines our response to them.

TITLE

The word ‘Wind’ without the definite article ‘the’ refers only to the natural phenomenon called Wind that can be both good and evil, constructive and destructive, depending on the circumstances and the attitude of people. There are at least four different facets of Wind as presented in the poem – a naughty child, a raging, destructive youth, a very helpful friend and a powerful god. The one-word title presents the persona of the natural force called Wind, who has enjoyed the status of a god in many cultures, including the Tamil culture and mythology. Thus, the title is very appropriate.

Literary Device

Personification

 Personification is a literary device in which the poet associates human attributes with some abstract idea or an inanimate object or a natural phenomenon.

Examples:

  • You tore the pages of the books

Here the pronoun ‘you’ refers to the wind, an element of nature. The wind is addressed as if it were a person.

  • He makes strong fires roar and flourishes

The possessive pronoun ‘he’ has been used to refer to the wind god who is presented as a man with tremendous power and force that can be both destructive and productive.

 Metaphor

A metaphor is a figure of speech that describes an object or action in a way that it is not literally true but helps explain an idea or make a comparison.

Examples:

  • You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings

Here the wind has been presented as a very clever and powerful being who terrifies and laughs at the weak and helpless.

  • You tore the pages of the books

 Here the action of the wind has been described as a mischievous act of a naughty child, who makes a mess of everything in his/her playful but destructive way.

Anaphora

Anaphora is a poetic device in which a word or group of words is used repeatedly to create a special effect or to emphasise something.

Examples:

  • Don’ t break the shutters of the windows.

 Don’t scatter the papers.

Don’t throw down the books on the shelf.

 Here the imperative structure beginning with ‘Don’t’ is repeated at the beginning of three consecutive lines showing the speaker’s strong appeal to the wind not to do certain things.

  • Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters, crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives, crumbling hearts

Here the word ‘crumbling’ is repeated a number of times to show the extent of damage caused by a stormy wind.

Symbolism

Apart from being one of the powerful natural forces, wind can also symbolise the adversities and challenges of life that have the potential of causing a lot of destruction, loss of life and property and the consequent pain.

There are other important symbols that the poet has used in the poem. For example, the symbols of ‘weak fires’ and ‘strong fires’ respectively represent people with little or no courage and people who have strong will and tenacity.

Another symbol that the poet has used is that of wind as a winnower i.e. someone who sorts things. Winnowing is one of the functions of wind. The wind strikes everybody and everything that comes its way and destroys whatever or whoever is weak.

Some other symbols that have been used in the poem are – Wind as a naughty child who likes to create mischief and ruffles things up for fun and Wind as a powerful jester who looks down upon weaklings.

RHYME SCHEME

The poem is written in free verse, hence there is no rhyming scheme or pattern in it.

Important Word-Meanings of difficult words from the lesson- WIND

Word-Meanings : Softly = slowly = धीरे से ; shutters= doors=दरवाजें ; scatter = spread बिखेर देना ; shelf = mantelpiece = शैल्फ ; tore = to cut apart =फाड़े ;  poking fun = laughing at =मजाक उड़ाना ; weaklings =the weak = कमजोर ; frail = fragile = कमजोर ; rafter = a wooden beam =कड़ी ; crumbling decaying, breaking up = नष्ट होते हुए , टूटते हुए ; winnow = to Separate =  उड़ाकर फेंकना  : Joint = link = जोड़ ; firmly = strongly =मजबूती से ; steadfast = firm =अटल ; blows out= to extinguish बुझाती है ; roar and flourish =resound and thrive =गरजना और प्रबल बनाना I

Short and Simple Summary of the lesson in English– WIND/ Summary in simple Words/ Critical appreciation of the lesson – WIND

Summary IN ENGLISH

The first part of the poem describes the action of the wind. The poet asks the wind to come softly. He requests the wind not to break the shutters of the windows, not to scatter the papers and throw down the books on the shelf. But the wind throws down the books and tears the pages of the books. The poet says that the wind pokes fun at weaklings. It brings down frail houses, crumbling doors, rafters, and even weak hearth. The wind crushes everything that is weak.

The poet advises us to be strong. Only then can we save ourselves against the wind. We should build strong homes with firm doors. Our bodies and hearts should also be strong. It is the way of the world to kick the weak and to be friends with the strong. The wind blows out the weak fires but makes the strong fires roar and flourish. Thus the poem conveys the idea that nobody cares for the weak. Even the wind is on the side of the strong people.

Summary:(2)

The poem opens with a plea to the wind to blow gently and not to cause damage. It is urged not to break the shutters of the windows or scatter papers by blowing them away. Personifying the wind, the poet tells it not to throw down books on the shelf and draws its attention to the papers that it has torn and the rain that it has brought again. The poet is not happy with the wind’s attitude here. He feels that wind takes advantage of weak people’s helplessness and blows so hard that their houses get destroyed; they may get injured or even killed, their lives are shattered, trees get uprooted and people suffer great loss. They feel very low and crestfallen. Wind, who has been referred to as a god, has the potential of destroying anything or anybody that comes in his way or tries to oppose him. In fact, wind god is so mighty that he charters his own course. It is difficult to control him, once he runs out of control.

The surest way to deal with the onslaught of wind is to build strong, wind-resistant houses that can withstand powerful and speedy wind storms. Wind rattles all the doors and sometimes pulls them out of their hinges. It is important to fix the doors strongly so that they do not come off. People need to be physically strong to face any eventuality caused by wind. And if people are determined and make concerted and coordinated efforts, wind who is alleged to be the friend of the strong only can become an equally good friend of the weak, who are poor and helpless people.

The poem closes with the observation that the wind extinguishes weak fires only. The strong flames are flared up further by it. If we are weak, the wind will overpower us; if we are strong it will aid us. When we make ourselves capable of combating the wind, it becomes a good friend.

MESSAGE/ Moral

The poem carries the message that one must develop mental toughness and physical strength in order to survive the hardships of life. If a person is feeble, he will break down just as the weak buildings crumble down in the harsh wind storms. Therefore, destructive forces should be turned into good friends with strength and determination.

SUMMARY IN HINDI

कविता का पहला भाग हवा की क्रिया का वर्णन करता है । कवि हवा से कहता है कि धीरे-धीरे आए । वह हवा से प्रार्थना है कि खिडकियों  के शीशों को न तोड़ें , कागजों को न बिखराए और शेल्फ पर पड़ीं पुस्तकें न गिराए । मगर हवा किताबें गिरा देती है और पुस्तकों के पन्ने फाड़ देती हैं कवि कहता है कि हवा कमजोर लोगों का मजाक उड़ाती है । यह कमजोर घरों , जर्जर दरवाजों , शहतीरों और यहाँ तक कि कमजोर दिलों का   भी नाश करती है । हवा हर उसी चीज़ को नष्ट कर देती देती है जो कमजोर हैं ।

कवि हमें मजबूत बनने की सलाह देता है । केवल तभी हम स्वयं को हवा से बचा पाएंगें । हमें अटल दरवाजों वाले मजबूत घर बनाने चाहिएँ । हमारे शरीर एवं दिलों को भी मजबूत होना चाहिए । यह संसार का दस्तूर है कि कमजोरों को ठोकर मारे और मजबूतों से दोस्ती करे । हवा कमजोर आग को बुझा देती है मगर तेज आग को अधिक प्रचंड करती है । इस प्रकार कविता यह विचार व्यक्त करती है कि कमजोरों की परवाह कोई नहीं करता । हवा भी मजबूत लोगों के पक्ष में है ।

Go to the NCERT Solution “The Sound of Music Part II”

 Read the extracts and answer the questions that follow.

Extract based questions and Answers-

STANZAS FOR COMPREHENSION

Read the following extracts and answer the questions that follow in one or two lines.

(I)

Wind, come softly.

Don’t break the shutters of the windows.

Don’t scatter the papers.

Don’t throw down the books on the shelf.

 The poem opens with the poet’s request to the wind. Addressing it directly, he wants the wind to blow gently so that the shutters of the windows are not broken and the papers are not blown about. The poet also urges the wind not to throw books down on the shelf.

(a) How does a violent wind disturb and damage things?

Ans: A violent wind breaks the window shutters and scatters the papers. It also throws down the books on the shelf.

 (b) What request does the poet make to the wind?

Ans: The poet requests the wind to blow gently and not to cause any damage or destruction.

(c) Which poetic device has been used in these lines?

Ans: The poetic device used in these lines is ‘anaphora’ as the imperative ‘Don’t’ is repeated in three consecutive lines.

(d) What effect does this device create?

Ans: The imperative repetition of the word ‘Don’t’ at the beginning of three consecutive lines expresses the poet’s strong urge to the wind to be gentle and kind. It also creates a unique rhythm in the poem.

(II)

There, look what you did – you threw them all down.

You tore the pages of the books.

You brought rain again.

You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings.

In these lines, the poet demonstrates the damage caused by the strong and fierce wind. it has thrown down all the books from the shelf and turn their pages.it causes the clouds to make rain. The poet believes that the wind, by destroying the weak things, seems to mock at their frailty and fragility.

(a) Whom does the poet address as ‘you’?

Ans: The poet addresses the wind that has been blowing fiercely as ‘you’.

(b) What does ‘them’ refer to?

Ans:‘Them’ refers to the books on the shelf.

 (c) How have the pages of the books been torn?

Ans: The wind has blown so fiercely that the books placed on the shelf have fallen down and their pages have been torn when they fluttered because of the wind.

(d) How does the wind bring rain?

Ans: Wind accumulates and shakes up vapour-laden clouds to cause rain.

(e) How does the wind deal with the weaklings?

 Ans: The wind harms and terrifies the weaklings with its fierce power and thus mocks their weakness.

(III)

 Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,

 crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,

crumbling hearts-

the wind god winnows and crushes them all.

These lines describe the havoc caused by a fierce wind. It destroys the inanimate things like weak houses, doors, rafters, wood etc. Similarly, the difficulties of discouraging human beings. The poet regards the wind as a god who acts like a winnower and sorts and destroys everything that comes in his contract. This means that the weak people and things are crushed by the destructive power of the wind.

 (a) Why are the houses, doors, rafters etc. crumbling?

Ans: The houses, doors, rafters etc. are crumbling because they are weak and cannot stand the onslaught of the destructive wind.

(b) Explain the expression: “crumbling lives, crumbling hearts”.

Ans: Many lives are lost when wind wreaks havoc. The lives of the survivors are shattered too because their loved ones are dead and their homes and property are destroyed. They are left with no hope in life.

 (c) Why has the wind been called ‘god’?

Ans: Wind has been called ‘god’ because, like ‘god’, he uses his power to remove and crush the undesirable, weak things.

 (d) What does the wind god do?

Ans: The wind god, using its force winnows and crushes everything and everybody that comes in its contact.

 (e) Which poetic device has been used in the first three lines?

 Ans: The poetic device used in these lines is anaphora i.e. the repetition of certain words. The word ‘crumbling’ has been repeatedly used to emphasise the destruction caused by the wind.

(IV)

He won’t do what you tell him.

So, come, let’s build strong homes,

Let’s joint the doors firmly.

 Practise to firm the body.

Make the heart steadfast.

The poet believes that the wind god acts according to his own wishes and does not relent even when we people urge him. Therefore, it is essential to equip our buildings, our bodies, and our hearts with immense strength so that we may withstand strong winds. As far as human lives are concerned, the wind is a symbol of daunting difficulties and challenges that can be overcome only with exceptional strength resistance, resilience, courage and determination.

 (a) Who is ‘he’ in the first line?

Ans:He’ in the first line refers to the wind god.

 (b) According to the poet, what preparations should be made to face the fury of the wind?

Ans: According to the poet, we should build strong homes and close the doors firmly to face the fury of the wind as he attacks and destroys the weaklings only.

 (c) What is his attitude towards people?

Ans: He does not pay any heed to the requests and wishes of people and keeps blowing violently and causing destruction.

(d) Why should the houses and doors be made strong?

Ans: The houses and doors should be made strong to withstand the onslaught of the violent wind.

 (e) What is the poet’s advice to people?

Ans: The poet advises people to strengthen their bodies as well as hearts to face the hardships that come their way. They should equip themselves with physical & mental strength, grit and determination so that they can remain unruffled and unharmed in difficult times.

(V)

Do this, and the wind will be friends with us.

 The wind blows out weak fires.

 He makes strong fires roar and flourishes.

His friendship is good.

We praise him every day.

The poet believes that if we are strong enough not to be shaken by the wind, it will become our friend. Here wind stands for the hardships of life. These hardships can make only weak people stagger; the strong people become stronger still by facing the difficulties, just like the wind can extinguish only weak flames of fire and the strong flames burn stronger still with a loud roar. If we befriend the wind, it will prove to be good for us.

(a) What does ‘this’ stand for in these lines?

Ans: This stands for the strengthening of buildings, bodies and human hearts so as to withstand the onslaught of furious wind.

(b)What is the impact of the wind on small, weak fires?

Ans: The wind overpowers the small, weak fires and is able to put them out.

(c) How does the wind treat strong fires?

Ans: Strong fires become fiercer when the wind blows. Instead of yielding to its power, their big flames rise higher and become stronger.

(d)  Whose friendship does the poet talks of? Why is it good?

Ans: The poet talks of the friendship of people with the wind. This friendship is possible only when people are so healthy and strong, both mentally and physically, that they play bravely with the wind like a friend instead of falling a prey to its destructive force.

(e)What does the poet mean by: “We praise him every day.”?

Ans: Wind is treated as a god with tremendous power and influence on our lives. We need to pacify this god in order to keep him pleased so that we can escape his wrath.

COMPREHENSION OF STANZAS

STANZA 1

Wind, come softly.

Don’t break the shutters of the windows.

Don’t scatter the papers.

Don’t throw down the books on the shelf.

There, look what you did—you threw them all down.

You tore the pages of the books.

You brought rain again.

You’re very clever at poking fun at weaklings:

Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,

crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,

crumbling hearts—

the wind god winnows and crushes them all

हिंदी अनुवाद – हवा,धीरे से जाओ । खिड़कियों के दरवाजे मत तोड़ों । कागजों को मत बिखेरो । शैल्फ पर किताबों को मत गिराओ । जरा देखो , तुमने क्या कर दिया – तुमने उन सबको दिया । तुमने किताबों के पन्ने फाड़ दिए । तुम फिर से बरसात ले आई । कमजोरों का मज़ाक उड़ाने में तुम बड़ी होशियार हो । कमज़ोर गिरते हुए मकान , टूटते हुए दरवाजे , गिरती हुई कड़ियाँ , टूटती हुई लकड़ी , कमजोर शरीर , टूटते हुए जीवन , टूटते हुए दिल – वायु देव सभी को पछाड़ देता हिया और चूर – चूर कर देता है ।

Questions :

(i) Why does the poet want the wind to come slowly?

(ii) What is the effect of the strong wind on the books?

(iii) What is the attitude of the wind towards the weaklings?

(iv) What does the wind do to the windows?

(v) What does the wind god do? 

Answers :

 (i) The poet wants the wind to come slowly so as not to cause trouble to the weak.

 (ii) The strong wind throws down the books and tears their pages.

(iii) The wind pokes fun at the weaklingS.

(iv) It breaks the shutters of the windows.

(v) The wind god separates the food grain from the chaff.

STANZA 2

He won’t do what you tell him.

 So, come, let’s build strong homes,

 Let’s joint the doors firmly.

 Practise to firm the body.

 Make the heart steadfast.

Do this, and the wind will be friends with us.

The wind blows out weak fires.

He makes strong fires roar and flourishes.

His friendship is good.

We praise him every day.

हिंदी अनुवाद – वह (हवा) जो तुम उसे करने को कहोगे वैसा नहीं करेगी । इसलिए आओ हम शक्तिशाली घर बनाएं , हम दरवाजों को मजबूती से जोड़ें । शरीर को ठोस बनाने का अभ्यास करें । दिल को अटल रखें यदि ऐसा करेगें तो हवा हमारी मित्र बन जाएगी । हवा कमज़ोर आग को ही बुझाती है । वह तेज अग्नि को गरजने वाली और प्रबल बनाती है । उसकी मित्रता अच्छी है । हम प्रतिदिन उसकी प्रशंसा करते हैं ।  

Questions :

(i) Why does the poet ask us to make strong houses?

(ii) What should we do our hearts and bodies?

(iii) When will the wind be our friend?

 (iv) What is the effect of the wind on the fire?

(v) Name the poem and the poet.

 Answers :

(i) The poet asks us to build strong houses as a defence against the wind.

(ii) We should make our bodies firm and our hearts steadfast.

 (iii) The wind will be our friend when we are strong.

 (iv) The wind blows out the weak tires but makes the strong fires very strong.

 (v) The name of the poem is ‘wind’ and the name of the poet is Subramania Bharati

MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS

 Choose the correct answer :

1. What does the wind do?

       (A) It throws down all the books on the shelf

       (B) It tears the pages of the books.

       (C) It brings the rain again.

       (D) All the above.

2. What does the wind poke fun at?

       (A) Weak houses and weak doors.

       (B) Weak rafters and weak wood.

       (C) Weak hearts and weak bodies.

       (D) Any living or non-living thing that is weak and crumbling.

3. The wind god winnows—

       (A) Anything that is big and strong.

       (B) Anything that is weak and crumbling.

       (C) Anything that is in this world.

       (D) Anything that is not natural.

4. We can make friends with the wind god if we are—

       (A) true.

       (B) honest.

       (C) strong.

       (D) respectful.

5. What is the central idea of this poem?

      (A) We should make friends with the wind god.

      (B) If we are strong, even gods will be on our side.

      (C) God helps the weak and the needy.

      (D) We should love all creatures of God.

6. Name the poet of this poem.

      (A) Robert Frost.

      (B) Subramania Bharati.

      (C) W.B. Yeats.

      (D) Phoebe Cary.

Hints: 1. D      2. D        3. B         4. C         5. B         6. B.

Go to the NCERT Solution “The Little Girl”

Additional Very Short Answer Type Questions

1. How does the poet want the wind to come?

Ans. The poet wants the wind to come softly.

2. What should the wind not break?

Ans. The wind should not break the shutters of the windows.

3. What should the wind not scatter?

Ans. The wind should not scatter the papers.

4. What should the wind not throw down?

Ans. The wind should not throw down the books on the shelf.

5. What did the wind do to the books?

 Ans. The wind through the books down and tore their pages.

6. Who does the wind make fun of – weak people or strong people?

Ans. The wind makes fun of weak people.

7. What does the wind god do?

Ans. The wind god separates the food grain from the chaff.

8. What does the poet propose to do about homes?

Ans. The poet proposes that they should make strong homes.

9. What should we do about our body and heart?

 Ans. We should make our body firm and heart steadfast.

10. What does the wind do to weak fires?

Ans. The wind blows out weak fires.

11. What does the wind do to strong fires?

 Ans. The wind makes strong fires roar and flourish.

12. Who is the poet of the poem ‘Wind’?

Ans. Subramania Bharati.

Short Answer Type Questions  (30 to 40 words)

1. Give in brief the central idea of the poem ‘Wind’.

Ans. The central idea of the poem is that nobody cares for the weak. Even gods help the strong. Therefore, we should not pray for mercy or help. We should make ourselves strong. If we are strong, everybody will like to be friends with us.

2. What lesson can we learn from the action of the wind on the tire?

Ans. If the fire is weak, the wind blows it out. If the fire is strong, the wind adds more power to it. It makes it roar and flourish. Therefore, we should make ourselves strong. If we are weak, everybody will harm us. If we are strong, everybody will like to be friends with us. Even gods help those who are strong. They pay no attention to the prayers of the weak

3. How does the wind poke fun at weaklings?

Ans. Weaklings pray to the wind to come softly. They pray to the wind god not to break the shutters of their windows. But the wind god does not listen to their prayers. Rather he pokes fun at them. He blows down their houses. He breaks their doors. He breaks their bodies, their lives and even their hearts. He crushes them badly.

Q4. Why does the poet plead with the wind to blow softly?

Ans: When the wind blows softly, it is harmless and enjoyable but when it blows fiercely, it wreaks havoc. Therefore, the poet wants the wind to be gentle and soft.

 Q5. What kind of destruction is caused by the violent wind?

 Or

What are the things that the wind does in the first stanza? (Textual)

Ans: When the wind blows violently, it destroys everything. It breaks the window shutters, scatters papers around, makes the books fall down, tears their pages and brings about the heavy downpour.

Q6. Explain the line: You brought rain again”.

Or

How does the wind bring rain?

 Ans: The line highlights the fact that the wind brings rain. He blows the vapour-laden clouds around and causes them to make rain. Sometimes the rain brought about by the wind also causes damage.

 Q7. How does the wind make fun of the weaklings?

Ans: The strong wind uses his destructive power to harm weak persons and delicate things. Without showing any mercy or sympathy, he crushes weak houses, crumbling doors, and even human lives and hearts. By moving violently and destroying the weak, he seems to make fun of their helplessness.

 Q8. What does the poet say the wind god winnows? (Textual)

Ans: The poet states that the wind god winnows because it is nature’s way of rejecting the frail and unhealthy objects. In a way, the wind god separates the weak from the strong like the chaff is separated from the grain. The wind god is the winnower, the wind as the winnowing fan and the weak men are the grain.

 Q9. What does the poet think of the wind god’s attitude to the requests of people?

Ans: The poet believes that the wind god is indifferent to the requests of people. Even though people request him to blow gently, he does not pay any heed to their pleas. He is defiant and does not care about the wishes of people. It means that the intensity of the wind is beyond human control.

Q10. What should people do to avoid the destruction caused by the strong winds?

Or

Why should people build strong houses and strong doors?

Ans: To avoid the destruction caused by the strong wind, it is essential that people construct solid, sturdy houses with firm strong doors. The buildings should be able to resist the attack of the violent wind.

Q11. What does the wind symbolize in this poem?

Ans: The poet converts the natural force, wind, into a symbol in the context of human life. The destructive wind symbolizes the hardships, problems and obstructions in the life of people. Just as buildings have to face strong winds, people have to encounter difficulties and obstacles in life.

Q12. Why does the poet want people to have firm bodies and strong hearts?

Ans: In life, people have to encounter the winds of hardships, unfavourable circumstances, and big obstacles. If people are infirm, unhealthy, and weak-willed, they will be defeated by these difficulties. But, if they are physically strong and mentally confident, they can resist all the hardships boldly and successfully.

Q13. What is the impact of the wind on weak fires and strong fires?

Ans: Weak fires are powerless and helpless against the force of winds and are easily extinguished. But the strong fires when fanned by the wind, rage more furiously and burn with a thundering roar.

Q14. What should we do to make friends with the wind? (Textual)

Ans: As friendship exists and thrives among equals, we can befriend the wind only by becoming as strong and forceful as he is. If we are physically and mentally strong, we can embrace it as a friend without being afraid of its fury.

Q15. Why does the poet remark that the friendship of wind is good?

Ans: The poet remarks that the friendship of wind is good because the wind has both kind and wicked aspects. If we are weak, its destructive force causes havoc. But if we are strong, we may harness its power and use it for constructive purposes. As a friend, the wind works for the benefit of mankind.

Q16. What do the last four lines of the poem mean to you? (Textual)

Ans: The last four lines of the poem carry an important message about it- e benefits of strength. Strong people come out stronger in the face of difficulties and challenges, just like the strong fires burn brighter when harsh winds blow. Thus even the trying situations become friendly for strong people.

Q17. Briefly describe the central idea of the poem.

 Ans: The poem “Wind” motivates us to face challenges of life with grit and determination. It inspires us to face all hardships of life with courage. Representing the turmoil and troubles of life, the strong wind teaches us the value of unshakeable determination.

 Q18. What can wind do if it becomes our friend?

Ans: Wind can teach us positive qualities just like our good friends do. Its strength can teach us to be tough and determined in difficult times and its force can teach us to face obstacles bravely.

LONG ANSWER QUESTIONS

(to be answered in about 100 – 150 words each)

Q1. What kind of destruction can be caused by the violent wind?

Ans: The wind, through its violent force, can play havoc in the world. It causes huge damage to life and property. Buildings collapse, window shutters are broken, papers are scattered and books are thrown down. The wind causes clouds to make heavy showers which create many problems for the poor and weak people. When the violent wind blows, the fragile, unsturdy houses crumble down, doors come off their hinges, rafters fall down, and the wooden panels collapse. The small flames of fires are also extinguished by the wind. The god of wind suppresses and destroys weak people and structures. Proud of his power, he causes large-scale destruction.

Q2. How does the poet use wind as a symbol in relation to human beings?

 Or

Human life is full of hardships. How does the poet reveal it?

Ans: In relation to human beings, the wind has been used by the poet as a symbol of hardships that life is dotted with. Men have to encounter terrible suffering, sorrows, difficulties, and failures. So powerful are these troubles that only very strong people are able to overcome them and move ahead. Weak, infirm and indecisive people surrender in front of hardships and accept defeat. But, strong people with patience, unwavering minds and firm will fight against the hardships and emerge even stronger. Human lives can never be devoid of struggle. One only needs physical and mental strength to overcome the unfavourable circumstances. The winds of troubles cannot harm those who have the power to stand firm. Strong people can turn their difficulties into opportunities and learn lessons from them. They know how to turn tides in their favour.

Q3. Which values of life do the poet emphasize in the poem? Or

Do you think the poem “Wind” is a didactic poem? What moral values does it preach?

Ans: The poem “Wind”, by Subramania Bharati, teaches a very deep moral lesson for human beings. The poet uses the wind as a symbol of problems in life while the sturdy structures symbolize unfaltering, strong human beings. The poet uses both the symbols and direct statement to bring home the values of strong physical health and mental powers, confidence and a firm will.

Life is not a cakewalk; it is strewn with obstacles and challenges. However only the weak-willed and infirm people are unable to beat these obstacles and challenges, and meekly accept their failures and defeats.

The forces of unfavourable, unhappy circumstances fail to conquer those who have the courage. Such people beat all odds against them and come out victorious and move on. Just as a wind extinguishes only small flames and the high flames rise higher with the wind, similarly troubles terrify only those who have not equipped themselves with an unfaltering courage and determination. Difficulties are a part of life; they cannot be avoided, but they can be resisted through courage and confidence. Thus, the poem is didactic in nature and emphasizes the values of courage, confidence and strong will.

Go to the NCERT Solution “Rain on the Roof”

QUICK REVIEW OF THE POEM

1. How does the poet want the wind to come?

(A) fastly                                                              (B) slowly

 (C) dimly                                                             (D) in a tempestuous way

Ans.  (B) slowly

2. What does the poet want the wind to do?

 (A) don’t break the shutters of windows(B) don’t scatter the papers 

(C) don’t throw down the books                               (D) all the above

Ans.  (D) all the above

3. What does ‘crumbling hearts’ refer to?

 (A) old persons                                                                (B) weak persons

 (C) rich and strong persons                         (D) despondent persons

 Ans.  (B) weak persons

4. Who does the wind make fun of?

(A) the rich                                                         (B) the strong

 (C) the weak                                                     (D) none of these

Ans. (C) the weak

5.’You brought rain again’. Who does ‘you’ refer to?

 (A) the wind                                                      (B) the poet

(C) the cloud                                                      (D) the children

Ans. (A) the wind

6. What sort of houses does the poet ask us to make?

 (A) luxury houses                                           (B) huts

 (C) strong houses                                           (D) weak houses

 Ans. (C) strong houses

7. The wind does not listen to us. What should we do?

 (A) afraid of him                                              (B) make ourselves strong to face him

(C) request him not to make us harm     (D) none of these options

 Ans. (B) make ourselves strong to face him

8. What is the effect of the wind on weak fires?

(A) makes them stronger                             (B) blow them out

 (C) let them burn as before                        (D) all the options are correct

Ans.  (B) blow them out

9. What is the effect of the wind on strong fires?

 (A) makes them roar and flourish            (B) blows them out as usual

(C) let them burn                                             (D) all the options are correct

Ans. (A) makes them roar and flourish

10. Select the name of the poet of the poem ‘Wind’.

(A) Robert Frost                                                (B) Subrarnania Bharati

 (C) Coates Kinney                                           (D) William Wordsworth

 Ans. (B) Subramania Bharati.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Ch-2.1 WIND- Extra Questions and Notes

  1. SHWETHA

    VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY HELPFUL

  2. Shailesh Post author

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  3. Anshika Singh

    Not bad , it is really. Too helpful for me thank you so much👍👍👍👍

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